Class times:

Tuesdays 6 to 9 p.m.

**1 course = 3 General Education Credits**

Band 3 course descriptions

ENVR-1038-60 Climate Change, Adaptation & Innovation

In the coming decades, we are challenged to reduce greenhouse gas emissions causing global warming while adapting to climate change impacts. Promoting green innovations to reduce climate changing pollution and taking bold actions to increase resiliency to extreme weather, floods, droughts and sea-level rise are societal priorities in Ontario and across Canada. While there are many challenges to developing an innovative, resilient and adaptive society, climate change also offers many new opportunities for green innovation to develop sustainability solutions in a diversity of sectors. Covering climate change related topics such city planning, green energy, sustainable food production, adaptive infrastructure, climate-smart natural resource management and green transportation; this course invites students to explore emerging, innovative solutions and creative responses to address climate change issues. While we will also investigate the science and politics of climate change and the range of climate impacts, the course will predominantly focus on learning about green solutions that contribute to building resilient, adaptive societies in response to climate change.

FILM-1009-60 Film Genres: Comedy

This course is for movie lovers who want to study the presentation of comedy on the silver screen. An analysis of different approaches to humour will show how audience interpretation is shaped by various directors. We will also study the ways in which comedy reflects the social tastes and anxieties of our times. Students will be required to watch one weekly film outside of class hours. Some of the films which we will study are Horrible Bosses, 21 Jump Street, Bridesmaids, and Groundhog Day.

INDS-1013-02 Perspectives on Hockey

For many Canadians, hockey is more than a sport, it is a passion. Through hockey literature (fiction and non-fiction), multimedia presentations (radio and television broadcasts, feature films, and documentaries), and discussion, students will gain an understanding of how hockey has shaped Canadian culture, and how politics, economics, the media, and society have shaped a national passion.

INDS-1059-02 Myth, Folktale & Fairy Tale

This course will examine a selection of myths and legends from Ancient Greece, Continental Europe, and Britain. We will look at how these stories have evolved over time from sacred tales to secular stories. The course will also explore the important role that folktales and fairy tales have played in shaping the culture of the people who told these stories. Our goals will be to discover connections among the stories, seek out similar themes and characters across cultures and time periods, and explain the enduring popularity of these stories to this day.

INDS-1063-01 Stay Tuned: Rise of TV Culture

This is a course for television lovers and haters alike. Through studying the evolution of TV from a passing fad to a cultural necessity, we will look at the ways in which television has hard-wired itself into the circuitry of our daily lives. In this course, we'll examine the varied history of television shows from sitcoms to dramas and from reality TV to news parody. An investigation into the strength of TV's cultural impact will help us attempt to answer the ultimate question: Do we program television, or does television program us?

INDS-1081-01 Personal Wellness

This course introduces students to the concept of wellness.  Students develop strategies for a healthy lifestyle in all aspect of their lives.  Through traditional lectures and learning activities, they learn through both individual and group processes.   They investigate wellness as it applies to mindfulness, self-responsibility, social/emotional development, stress-management, physical activity, spirituality, substance abuse, nutrition, and complementary health.   This course provides the opportunity for students to evaluate their present lifestyle, identify successes, and develop areas requiring personal growth.

INDS-1085-01 Sci-Fi Anime

This course introduces students to the study of science fiction (sci-fi) anime produced between the 1980s and the early 2000s. Focusing on such major works as Astro Boy, Akira, Nausica of the Valley of the Wind, Ghost in the Shell, Neo Genesis Evangelion, and The Animatrix (to name a few), this course examines how the genre engages with specific science fiction themes and tropes and pays special attention to how these engagements play out within a Western cultural milieu. Through the consideration of such topics as nuclear annihilation, environmental degradation, digital subjectivity, adolescent anxiety, and virtual reality, this course also introduces students to the critical work of some important anime scholars, including Christopher Bolton, Thomas Lamarre, Susan Napier, and Sharalyn Orbaugh. No knowledge of Japanese is required.

PHIL-1009-01 Ethics & Society

What is the right thing to do? Although this turns out to be a remarkably difficult question to answer, it is the central focus of this course, and we will try to come at it from two different directions. On the one hand, we will consider a number of ethical theories that attempt to give a general, theoretical underpinning for morality. On the other hand, we will approach the question of the right thing to do from the context of particular moral problems that confront modern society such as world poverty, euthanasia, and the freedom of speech. If you want to be better prepared to debate ethical topics by understanding the issues behind them, then this course is for you.

POLI-1022-01 Rights & Freedoms

Freedom of speech; freedom of religion; freedom from discrimination. Where do those rights come from? And what happens when your freedoms begin to restrict mine? This course will investigate the important role that constitutions play in democratic society. Current examples will be explored to study how laws can be made, changed, and struck down by the courts.

PSYC-1067-62 Culture of Addictions

As an introductory and interdisciplinary survey of the role of addiction in human cultures, this course is designed to expose students to how narcotic as well as non-narcotic-related addiction manifest themselves within various individual and institutional practices. In particular, students will explore the major biological, psychological and social/cultural theories applied to addiction. Focus is given to the nature of drug use, conceptions of 'the addict,' how drugs impact the brain, the impact on family, and consequences for changing social drug behaviors. This course also explores current theoretical and practical treatment approaches and education and prevention strategies. Emphasis will be given to special issues and hot topics in drug addiction, including youth, women, media portrayal of drug use and current debates on the war on drugs. Finally, understanding common perspectives on treatment and prevention strategies related to drug dependence and education will be studied.

PSYC-1112-01 Psychology of Board and Card Games

Are you an expert at bluffing in poker? How about a chess grand-master? A shrewd negotiator in Catan? Or a ruthless strategist in Risk? This psychology course explores the wide variety of behaviour and mental processes that can be seen in classic and modern tabletop (board, card, dice, role-playing, tile-based and miniature) games. Topics covered will include cognitive, social, personality, developmental, and positive psychology as they relate to classic and modern tabletop games.

SOCI-1084-02 Global Competition – The Olympics

Competition! Commercialization! Corruption! Each staging of the modern Olympic Games is a unique window into global society. This course explores the Winter and Summer Olympics from 1896 until the present. In weekly seminars and lectures, students will examine how international sporting culture has evolved in the modern era. From the imperial celebrations of the early games to contemporary controversies over doping and gender, the Olympics have always reflected broader social and political moments in our connected world. In other words, stories of the games are also stories about the people and events that shape history.

ENVR-1038-60 Climate Change, Adaptation & Innovation

In the coming decades, we are challenged to reduce greenhouse gas emissions causing global warming while adapting to climate change impacts. Promoting green innovations to reduce climate-changing pollution and taking bold actions to increase resiliency to extreme weather, floods, droughts and sea-level rise are high priorities in Ontario and across Canada. While there are many challenges to developing an innovative, resilient and adaptive society, climate change also offers many new opportunities for green innovation to develop sustainability solutions in a diversity of sectors. Covering climate change related topics such as city planning, green energy, sustainable food production, adaptive infrastructure, climate-smart natural resource management and green transportation, this course invites students to explore emerging, innovative solutions and creative responses to address climate change issues. While we will also investigate the science and politics of climate change and the range of climate impacts, the course will predominantly focus on learning about green solutions that contribute to building resilient, adaptive societies in response to climate change.