Meet the partners we work with!

If you’re new to the R&D world, or perhaps just new to CRI, we thought we’d share some of the recent success we’ve had with our partners locally and nationally. 

We are proud of the contributions that we have been able to make in our Canadian economy. CRI exists to build a better world through R&D that removes business’ growth barriers - here are example of how we do that:

 

Booch Organic Kombucha

Booch — one of the largest kombucha breweries in Ontario, and top three largest in Canada—manufactures organic craft kombucha, focusing particularly on local and seasonal ingredients and sustainable practices.

 

The challenge:

Booch needed a method to control ethanol levels throughout the brewing, fermenting, and flavouring processes, in order to maintain a final ethanol level below regulatory requirements.

 

The result:

Fanshawe faculty and student research assistants

  • Analyzed the ethanol content of kombucha at various stages
  • Identified key factors involved in the production of ethanol
  • Recommended a filtration method that successfully reduced ethanol levels to the target amount
  • Determined the proper instruments to measure and detect trace amounts of ethanol 

 

*This project was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

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Booch Organic Kombucha
Mycionics HARV™ SOPs Manual Development

Mycionics was founded in 2014 to solve the increasing labor shortage by designing an AI-based robotic harvesting solution for mushroom farms. The HARV™ system increases the quality, consistency, and yield of mushroom farming, while improving food traceability and reducing food-safety risks. The next stage of development is to go-to-market.

 

The challenge:

To develop a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) manual to guide farm workers and supervisors in operating the HARV™ robotic mushroom harvesting solution. An SOP Manual is an integral part of the solution to enable safe and efficient operation, and a requirement for successful product launch.

 

The result:

CRI researcher Mustafa Khdair, an expert in business process management, analyzed the operating environment of each machine of the HARV™ solution, and outlined a chronological order of tasks to successfully operate the overall system, utilizing the right tools and equipment, whilst maintaining highest level of safety. 

 

CRI's team:

  1. Analyzed the HARV™ work environment for safe and efficient harvesting operation
  2. Finalized the HARV™ Standard Operating Manual blue print for branding as part of the solution commercialization and roll out for use by Mycionics partners in Ontario

 

*This project was supported by SONAMI Ontario.

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Mycionics
Four All Ice Cream

Four All Ice Cream is a Kitchener, ON-based company makes handcrafted ice cream using all-natural, locally- sourced ingredients for a sweet treat that won’t compromise their customers’ well-being. 

The challenge:

To optimize the formulation of their existing vegan ice cream base in order to simplify the production process, improve overflow, and enhance taste and texture

The result:

A Fanshawe faculty researcher: 

  • Sourced new forms of ingredients that were difficult to make in-house, without compromising on quality 
  • Identified new, vegan-friendly forms of protein for the ice cream base 
  • Developed a new formulation that reduced labour time and enhanced taste and texture

 

*This project was supported by SONAMI Ontario.

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Four All Ice Cream
Aspire Food Group

Aspire Food Group is a global leader in advanced insect agriculture with operations in London, ON and Austin, TX, that produces cricket-based food products for people, pets, and plants.*

The challenge:

Analysis of the end product of their production process, in order to determine the most economical method to best preserve the nutritional benefits of its products. 

The result:

Fanshawe faculty and student research assistants:

Developed in house SOPs for the analysis of dried cricket-based products 

Provided analyses of proteins, amino acids, and fats and free fat acids of samples produced through various processes 

 

*This project was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

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ASPIRE Food Group
Lignition

Lignition, a seed treatment company based in Brantford, ON, manufactures a product that supports photosynthesis and promotes higher yields for crops.*

The challenge:

Examine using novel seed coating to increase carbon capture. This involved optimizing the coating of seeds at different levels of treatment for improved distribution and consistency of the Lignition product using a seed coater ahead of field trials. 

The result:

Fanshawe faculty and student research assistants:

• Conducted test runs to optimize coating procedure

• Measured and verified the distribution of the treatment and consistency of the seed coating

• Treated the required seeds for the field trials using the optimized methods and provided Standard Operating Procedures for future seed treatments  

 

*This project was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

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Lignition. Ready. Set. Grow.
My Active Snacks

My Active Snacks is a Toronto-based- snack food start-up expanding the marketing for healthy snack food options. *

The challenge:

Support with recipe development and ingredient sourcing to develop a tasty snack puff that meets the strict keto diet requirements.

The result:

CRI researcher Josie Olaveson MBA, RSE created recipe formulations for two different flavours of the product. She sourced ingredients that tasted good, met keto requirements, and differentiated the product in a highly competitive market. She also identified a manufacturing process for commercial production.

 

*This project was supported by SONAMI Ontario.

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My Active Snacks
Hot Sauce Co.

The Hot Sauce Co. is a start-up business established by a young entrepreneur driven by passion for spicy food. With three products so far and a growing list of clients, this London-based food company was ready for an operational scale-up strategy to pave the road for more customers to taste its yummy offerings.

The challenge:

Increase production capacity to meet growing market demand in a controlled and systematic manner that ensures consistency of product quality.

The result:

CRI researcher Mustafa Khdair, an expert in business process management, analyzed the production process, estimated standard cost of products, and identified and assessed automation options. An interim scale-up solution for the product's bottling stage was reached that increases capacity, minimizes waste and ensures consistent output.

A customized commercial offer was negotiated with a bottling machinery vendor to enable a trial phase for the equipment for the new scale-up. This results in a solution that enables The Hot Cause Co's start-up to grow with reduced financial risk.

 

*This project was supported by SONAMI Ontario.

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The Hot Sauce Co.
Worth
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WORTH

Fanshawe Centre for Research & Innovation (CRI) is deeply proud to announce the successful completion of an impactful research project that spanned more than four years of development - Worth, a transformative initiative to inspire consumers to create positive change in the fashion industry through intentional design.

Worth's mission is to educate the next generation of consumers on the social and environmental impact associated with hyper-consumerism and fast fashion. The fashion industry is the second largest polluter in the world, and the environmental damage is increasing as the industry grows. Worth strives to lessen the demand for fast fashion in favour of a more sustainable alternative.

Worth designs timeless products using end-of-use textiles that were rescued from post retail and reuse streams. Using 100% of the articles collected, Worth's zero-waste, fully circular approach relies on the idea that items have worth even after they’ve been discarded. All of Worth's remanufactured items are produced by Goodwill Industries, in their facility in London,, where they operate a social benefits program that focuses on skills training, functional language education, and meaningful work for newcomers to Canada and individuals who face barriers to employment. 

The next phase of this exciting project is the formal launch of Worth through partner Goodwill Great Lakes Region. Through the SeeWorth website, the story of changing a broken fashion industry into one that is driven by sustainability first is being told. Backing up the initiative, a team of sewers are trained and working, inventory of product is in stock, and a marketing strategy is ready to power up. To date, 180 jobs have been created and 2.5 million pounds of fashion industry waste have been diverted from landfill.

This is a very large undertaking and would not be possible without the funding from the federal and municipal governments, including Fanshawe College's second-ever SSHRC grant.

Congratulations to Professors Jennifer Wright Meredith Jones with the School of Design in the Faculty of Creative Industries who led the research project to create Worth. CRI is very proud of this milestone.