Summer 2020

Summer course registration has ended (as of May 15, 2020).

 

Please monitor www.fanshawec.ca/covid19 and this page for future updates.

 

If you are interested in reviewing the Course Information Sheets for more details on any of the courses below, please go to this link and search for the specific classes: https://fanshawe.ecoursemap.com. You can access the Course Outlines by entering your FanshaweOnline (FOL) username and password.


Courses subject to change. 

Online (May-August)

 

BIOL-3012-40 Biology: Select Topics (pre-requisite for BIOL 3013)
In this course, emphasis is placed on metabolic process in biology at the cellular level. The topics discussed include cell structures and functions, DNA structure and protein synthesis, evolution, molecular genetics, and population dynamics.
* For admission to programs where a 12U Biology is required, this course must be paired with BIOL-3013: College Qualifying Biology

 
BIOL-3013-40 College Qualifying Biology
This course provides students with an understanding of anatomical and physiological features in animals and plant functions and development. It also provides the credit needed for programs where Grade 12 College Biology is required for entrance to the program.
* For admission to programs where a 12U Biology is required, this course must be paired with BIOL-3012 Biology: Select Topics
 

CHEM-3014-40 Chemistry: Select Topics (pre-requisite for CHEM-3015)
This course teaches terminology, classification of matter, nomenclature, chemical formulae, chemical equations, calculation of quantitative composition of compounds, the mole concept, stoichiometry and related problem solving.
* For admission to programs where a 12U Chemistry is required, this course must be paired with CHEM-3015: College Qualifying Chemistry. 
 

CHEM-3015-40 College Qualifying Chemistry (CHEM-3014 is a pre-requisite for this course)
This course covers modern atomic theory and the periodic table; chemical bonding, gases, and gas laws, liquids and solids; solutions and concentrations; acids bases and salts; oxidation-reduction reactions; nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. It also provides the credit needed for programs where Grade 12 College Chemistry is required for entrance to the program.
* For admission to programs where a 12U Chemistry is required, this course must be paired with CHEM-3014: Chemistry: Select Topics.

 

COMM-3073-40 or 41 Communications
This course focuses on written and verbal communication skills. Students learn to prepare a variety of professional documents. In addition, students learn about research methods and documentation formats. The principles of effective writing - organization, grammar, style, clarity, and tone - are reinforced throughout the course. The goal of the course is to prepare students for the communication tasks and considerations they will encounter in the workplace and/or future education in order to meet the needs of employers and/or the communities they will serve. WRIT-1030 is a pre-requisite for this course.

  

ENGL-1062-40 Beyond Superheroes: Comics (same as ENGL-3022) FULL
This course explores the story of comics and how comics tell stories: we will investigate the development of comics as a medium as we apply the techniques of literary analysis to the course texts. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills in literary and artistic analysis through the careful reading of texts, and by writing about and discussing these texts.

 

ENGL-1064-40 Rebels, Misfits and Criminals (same as ENGL-3026) FULL
From Shakespeare's Richard III to the cult hit The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, rebels of all kinds have inspired our imaginations. This course examines representations of the rebel, misfit, and criminal in literature and film ranging from poetry of the Beat Generation, to the Civil Rights speeches of Malcolm X, to the music lyrics of Bob Dylan. Themes of the rebel and criminal as romantic outlaw and/or social innovator are explored, drawing on traditions of psychoanalysis, sociological deviance theories, and cultural criticism.

 

FILM-3005-40 Film Criticism and Technique FULL
How do film techniques influence the meaning of a film? Through close attention to editing, sound, mise-en-scene, movement, and cinematography, students learn how technique has changed since film's beginnings and how the decisions made behind the camera influence what we see on the screen today. Students will be required to watch one film per week outside of class time.

    

FILM-1003-40 Film Genres: War
This is a course for movie lovers who want to study the various depictions of war on the silver screen.  An analysis of different filmmaking techniques will show how audience interpretation is shaped by a director.  We will also study the ways in which real life history can be rewritten by Hollywood.  Students will be required to watch one weekly film outside of class hours.  Some of the films which we will study are Inglourious Basterds, The Hurt Locker, The Dark Knight, and Braveheart.

  

INDS-1026-40 Race & Inequality FULL
This course will examine racism and inequality in contemporary Canadian society. The following themes - the myth of a classless society; First Nations intergenerational trauma, residential schools, land treaties/claims, and police discrimination; Chinese head tax and the Exclusion Act; individual and systemic racism against visible minorities, new immigrants, and refugees; resistance to cultural and religious freedom of expression; and white privilege and power in society - will be explored through readings, lectures, class discussions and various assignments.

   

INDS-1094-40 Popular Culture FULL
This course explores a variety of themes found in the discourse of popular culture, critical theory, and visual communication such as the role of consumer society and the corporation, the cultural influence of T.V. and film, the creation of mythic characters, the politics of advertising, the construction of identity, the advent of cyber-cultures and technology, and the power of visual imagery. In addition, students learn to analyze and evaluate representations of race, gender, class and sexuality across various cultural mediums. The course uses articles, essays, book excerpts, and other media, which deal with current issues, ideas, and trends relating to contemporary culture.

  

INDS-1095-40 History of Rock & Roll: 70’s, 80’s & 90’s FULL
This course examines the social, cultural, and musical history of rock and roll in the 70's,80's, and early 90's. It examines the fragmentation of rock and roll which took place in the 70's and 80's when rock no longer dominated the pop charts. It also examines in detail how punk affected the evolution of rock and roll.

     

MATH-3068-40 Mathematics: Theory to Practice (Pre-requisite for MATH-3069)
Have you ever wondered about the calculations involved in launching a space shuttle or calculating the trajectory of a comet? In this course, student's avail themselves of the opportunity to learn complex, intermediary Mathematic theories and applications in a student-centered, group-study environment. Attention is paid to deconstructing Mathematical operations in relation to real-world scenarios of the students' choosing, permitting learners to comprehend Mathematical theory in novel and engaging ways.  Students can complete a Math assessment to go directly into MATH-3069.  For more information: www.fanshawec.ca/gap1/math .

 

MATH-3069-40 College Qualifying Mathematics (Pre-requisite for MATH-3079 & MATH-3080)
This course is for students who need a qualifying credit in Mathematics for entry into college programs. It is based on the Ontario standards for Grade 12 College Preparation Mathematics and will cover topics such as algebra, graphing, conversions, geometry, trigonometry, and statistics.
MATH-3068 Theory to Practice is a pre-requisite for this course.  Students can complete a Math assessment to go directly into MATH-3069. For more information: www.fanshawec.ca/gap1/math
  

MATH-3079-40 Calculus and Vectors
This course is a Grade 12U Calculus and Vectors equivalent and is divided into two modules. In the calculus module, students will develop their understanding of rates of change and the relationship between a function and its derivative for various functions. In the vectors module, students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in two-space and three-space. Both modules will have a strong focus on application problems. 
MATH-3069 College Qualifying Mathematics is a pre-requisite for this course.  Students can complete a Math assessment to go directly into MATH-3079. For more information: www.fanshawec.ca/gap1/math.  

  

MATH-3080-40 Advanced Functions
This course is a preparatory course for MATH 3079, Calculus and Vectors. It is based on the Ontario standards for Grade 12 Advanced Functions and will cover topics such as evaluating, graphing, combining and solving functions, specifically polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions.Grade 12U Mathematics is required for admission. MATH-3069 College Qualifying Mathematics is a pre-requisite for this course.  Students can complete a Math assessment to go directly into MATH-3080. For more information: www.fanshawec.ca/gap1/math.

  

PHIL-1024-40 Searching for Reality FULL
What exists, and how can we know it? Metaphysics and epistemology are the two branches of philosophy devoted to asking these questions, and this course is a historical examination of these two areas in Western philosophy. Each historical era will be viewed through the lens of a guiding question that frames metaphysical and epistemological investigation. Along the way we will discuss classical philosophical issues such as free will, the existence of God, the nature of consciousness, and the limits of science.

 

PSYC-1067-41 A Culture of Addictions (same as PSYC-3022) FULL
As an introductory and interdisciplinary survey of the role of addiction in human cultures, this course is designed to expose students to how narcotic as well as non-narcotic-related addiction manifest themselves within various individual and institutional practices. In particular, students will explore the major biological, psychological and social/cultural theories applied to addiction. Focus is given to the nature of drug use, conceptions of 'the addict,' how drugs impact the brain, the impact on family, and consequences for changing social drug behaviors. This course also explores current theoretical and practical treatment approaches and education and prevention strategies. Emphasis will be given to special issues and hot topics in drug addiction, including youth, women, media portrayal of drug use and current debates on the war on drugs. Finally, understanding common perspectives on treatment and prevention strategies related to drug dependence and education will be studied.

 

PSYC-1095-40 Psychology of Willpower FULL
January 1st is often the first day that many people fail at their well-intentioned New-Year's resolutions. Why is it so hard to change, whether it be diet, exercise, smoking or any other habit? This course is an examination of the elusive power that each one of us possess: Willpower. Psychological research and theory related to cognitive and social influences on intention, self-control, behaviour change, and willpower are the topics of interest for this course. Application of course material to real-life will take the form of students attempting to change a habit in their life and report on the success or failure of the attempted change relating it back to the theories learned in class.

 

PSYC-1121-40 Psychology of Music (PSYC-3028) FULL
A song plays on the radio. Do you turn up the volume or change the station? That depends on the effect that song has on you. Music can profoundly influence humans, animals, and even plants. In this course we examine the psychological effects of music. We discuss our interpretations of music and the role of music in emotions, learning, consciousness, therapy, and health. We debate the purpose of music, whether music makes us smarter, how music changes our behaviour, and the effects of violent and provocative musical expression. Finally, we examine why one person's music is another person's noise.

 

PSYC-1123-40 Art of Intelligence (same as PSYC-3034) FULL
This course introduces students to the various forms and theories of intelligence. Topics include creativity, emotional intelligence, non-verbal intelligence, social intelligence, mindfulness, learning disabilities and exceptionalities. This course comprehensively examines the role of intelligence for personal and professional success, as well as the application of both verbal and non-verbal forms.

   

PSYC-1124-40 The Dark History of Psychology (same as PSYC-3035) FULL
This course explores the dark side of the history of psychology, while focusing on some of the roles psychology and psychiatry have played in the oppression of certain groups. Through a variety of teaching methods, students will learn about lobotomies, inhumane experiments, deplorable conditions of Victorian asylums and other macabre phenomena to develop a general knowledge base about psychological theories, diagnoses, and treatments that have at times been harmful or even horrific. Through a critical lens, this course will encourage an understanding of the various influences on psychological theory and practice throughout the field's sometimes grisly history.

    

SOCI-1048-40 The Meaning of Sex (same as SOCI-3018) FULL
Although we often think of sex and sexuality as natural processes, social influences also affect sexual attitudes and behaviours.  This course will examine sexuality from a sociological perspective, examining how interactions, culture, and institutions affect this important dimension of human life.  Ranging in topics as diverse as sexualized media to prostitution, the course will examine the impact of sexual culture, norms, and institutions in the modern world.

 

SOCI-1050-40 Sociology of Sport (same as SOCI-3020) FULL
In this course we will examine the place of sport in modern societies, with particular attention to Canada. We will explore sport's relation to other social institutions such as the media, education, and government; we will examine sport in relation to aspects of social difference and inequality such as gender, race, class, and age; and finally, we will study sport and social processes such as socialization and deviance.

 

SOSC-1012-41 Discovering the Social Sciences 
This course connects the exciting world of social science to our everyday experiences. By highlighting discipline-specific tools and concepts used by anthropologists, psychologists, and sociologists, students gain insight into how people function and how relationships develop between individuals, society, and the global world.   Discussions focus on current and controversial topics that deal with individual, social, and global concerns, allowing us to understand the origins and consequences for some of life’s most pressing issues.  This interdisciplinary approach leads to a better understanding of social science and gives students the foundation for future learning in all areas of study.

 

WRIT-1030-40 or 41 Reason & Writing
This course will introduce students to essential principles of reading, writing, and reasoning at the postsecondary level. Students will identify, summarize, analyze, and evaluate multiple short readings and write persuasive response essays to develop their vocabulary, comprehension, grammar, and critical thinking.
This is a mandatory course and students must enroll in WRIT as part of their course selection. Students may place out by doing the WRIT assessment. www.fanshawec.ca/writ.

  
WRIT-1034-40 Reason & Writing (English for Academic Purposes)
This course will introduce students whose first language is not English to essential principles of reading, writing, and reasoning at the postsecondary level.  Students will identify, summarize, analyze, and evaluate multiple short readings and write persuasive response essays to develop their vocabulary, comprehension, grammar, and critical thinking.  Special attention will also be paid to developing academic vocabulary, correcting common ESL errors, enhancing academic listening and note-taking skills, and improving oral fluency and confidence.

 

Online Compressed (July - August)

 

HIST-1037-40 History of the World in 15 Machines (same as INDS-3025) FULL
This course examines the history of technology by surveying some of the most significant inventions in human history. Students learn not only about the machines themselves, but also about the inventors responsible for their creation. Topics include the invention of the printing press, telescope, plow, cotton gin, automobile, and computer. By placing these inventions in their historical contexts, students gain an understanding of the social, economic, and political impact of each invention.

  

HIST-1050-40 Modern History: 1914-1945 (same as HIST-3019) FULL
This course surveys the significant political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic developments that define the period between 1914 and 1945. Special emphasis is placed on the First and Second World Wars as well as the development of political ideologies like fascism, communism, and socialism during the interwar years.

  

INDS-1059-40 Myth, Folktale & Fairytale (same as INDS-3030) FULL
This course will examine a selection of myths and legends from Ancient Greece, Continental Europe, and Britain. We will look at how these stories have evolved over time from sacred tales to secular stories. The course will also explore the important role that folktales and fairy tales have played in shaping the culture of the people who told these stories. Our goals will be to discover connections among the stories, seek out similar themes and characters across cultures and time periods, and explain the enduring popularity of these stories to this day.

  

POLI-1024-40 American Politics (same as POLI-3006) FULL
This course will provide an introduction to the American political system. Beginning with the first colony in Jamestown, we will study the institutions and people that helped transform America into the global superpower it is today. Topics of study include elections, foreign policy, and the bill of rights. Special attention will be given to contemporary political issues and conflicts.

      

PSYC-1095-41 Psychology of Willpower 
January 1st is often the first day that many people fail at their well-intentioned New-Year's resolutions. Why is it so hard to change, whether it be diet, exercise, smoking or any other habit? This course is an examination of the elusive power that each one of us possess: Willpower. Psychological research and theory related to cognitive and social influences on intention, self-control, behaviour change, and willpower are the topics of interest for this course. Application of course material to real-life will take the form of students attempting to change a habit in their life and report on the success or failure of the attempted change relating it back to the theories learned in class.

 

 

 

 

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