Winter 2018

Select five courses (you can only choose one from each group).

COMM-3073-01 or 02 – Communications | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

 

This course focuses on written and verbal communication skills. Students learn to prepare a variety of professional documents. In addition, students learn about research methods and documentation formats. The principles of effective writing - organization, grammar, style, clarity, and tone - are reinforced throughout the course. The goal of the course is to prepare students for the communication tasks and considerations they will encounter in the workplace and/or future education in order to meet the needs of employers and/or the communities they will serve.

 

FILM-3009-01 – Canadian Film | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: FILM-5003 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is designed to develop a critical approach to Canadian cinema, both English- and French-language cinema; to examine individual creative expression in the films of important Canadian filmmakers, with emphasis on the history and theory of Canadian cinema; to develop the ability to identify technical and thematic aspects dominant in Canadian cinema; and to discern mediocre and excellent filmmaking technique.

 

HUMA-1021-01 – Discovering the Humanities  | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is designed to introduce college students to main themes in the humanities: literature, philosophy, history, religion, drama, music, and art. Students will gain an appreciation of important historical periods and of the evolution and progression of significant ideas. This course prepares students for further studies in the humanities.

 

INDS-3015-01 – Cuba: More Than Just Resorts  | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite:INDS-5004 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

In this course, students examine the culture, mystery, and controversy embodied in "Cuba". Beginning with Cuba's first encounters with imperialism and her struggle for independence, we study events of pivotal importance in Cuba's development: the revolution; alliance with the Soviet Union and the Bay of Pigs invasion; the infamous blockade; life in Cuba today. From education, health care, politics, agriculture, and the arts, every aspect of life in the revolutionary republic in which Canadians love to vacation will be explored. Finally, we ponder Cuba's role in the world today, some of her greatest challenges and issues, and what we in Canada might conclude about our unique neighbour to the south.

 

WRIT-1030-01 – Reason & Writing 1 | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course will introduce students to essential principles of reading, writing, and reasoning at the post-secondary level. Students will identify, summarize, analyze, and evaluate multiple short readings and write persuasive response essays to develop their vocabulary, comprehension, grammar, and critical thinking.

COMM-3073-03 – Communications  | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course focuses on written and verbal communication skills. Students learn to prepare a variety of professional documents. In addition, students learn about research methods and documentation formats. The principles of effective writing - organization, grammar, style, clarity, and tone - are reinforced throughout the course. The goal of the course is to prepare students for the communication tasks and considerations they will encounter in the workplace and/or future education in order to meet the needs of employers and/or the communities they will serve.

 

ENGL-7005-01 – Forms of Fiction 2  | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course introduces students to major works of fiction, each of which will be studied as a work of art, set in the contexts provided by history and by the theory and rhetoric of fiction. This course is a university transfer course, and is the equivalent of ENGL 1024E (Forms of Fiction) at the University of Western Ontario.

Only students who have completed ENGL-7004 are eligible to take ENGL-7005.

 

GRMN-3002-01 – German Language  | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course focuses on building German language skills to increase fluency and cultural awareness for everyday and professional purposes, and it is designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of German. Students will engage in spoken communications through structured activities that emulate common cultural and professional interactions, and will read and write culturally and professionally significant materials in German. Our focus will remain in particular on high-frequency vocabulary and basic grammar throughout these activities. Students who complete this course will thus acquire an introductory competence in German as it is spoken and written, and lived, around the world.

MATH-3068-01 – Mathematics: Select Topics | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: MATH-2004 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is for students who need to refresh or upgrade their mathematical knowledge and skills in preparation for entry into the College Qualifying Mathematics course (MATH-3069). It will cover topics such as operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals and exponents, as well as applications of these operations including ratios, proportions, and percents. The course finishes with an introduction to basic algebra. Attention is paid to deconstructing mathematical theories and applications in a student-centered environment permitting students to comprehend mathematical theory as it applies to real-world scenarios. It is strongly recommended that students who need review or preparation in foundational mathematics take this course.

 

MATH-3069-01 – College Qualifying Mathematics | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: MATH-2009 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is for students who need a qualifying credit in mathematics for entry into college programs. It is based on the Ontario standards for Grade 12 College Preparation Mathematics, and will cover topics such as algebra, graphing, conversions, geometry, trigonometry, statistics, and personal finance.

 

WRIT-1030-02 – Reason & Writing 1 | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course will introduce students to essential principles of reading, writing, and reasoning at the post-secondary level. Students will identify, summarize, analyze, and evaluate multiple short readings and write persuasive response essays to develop their vocabulary, comprehension, grammar, and critical thinking.

 

WRIT-3009-01 – Script Writing for Media  | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

There has never been a better time to be a writer. Thanks to the internet and many digital innovations, the writing market is exploding right now, and there are more opportunities than ever to get published in many forms of media. In this course, students learn how to write for various types of media, and aspiring writers gain the toolkit they need to develop themselves as both writers and entrepreneurs in the expanding writing market.

COMM-3073-04 – Communications | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course focuses on written and verbal communication skills. Students learn to prepare a variety of professional documents. In addition, students learn about research methods and documentation formats. The principles of effective writing - organization, grammar, style, clarity, and tone - are reinforced throughout the course. The goal of the course is to prepare students for the communication tasks and considerations they will encounter in the workplace and/or future education in order to meet the needs of employers and/or the communities they will serve.

 

ECON-3007-01 – Everyday Economics | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

Economics affects everyone. Most people think that the study of economics is simply about supply and demand, but it is much more. Economics defines how individuals, firms, and governments make decisions, and how the consequences of those collective decisions affect us. Economics will also help us learn basic critical thinking skills that are helpful now and in the future. This course will equip students with basic economic principles and establish the foundation for applications within our daily lives: the reasons why our decisions should be different from our parents' choices; issues of declining birthrates; the effects of natural disasters; furthermore, the reasons why economics trumps politics. Students will find the course useful, stimulating, revealing, and often engaging. Students must be prepared to come to class with questions and an inquiring attitude.

 

MATH-3080-01  – Advanced Functions | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is a preparatory course for MATH-3079, Calculus and Vectors. It is based on the Ontario Standards for Grade 12 Advanced Functions, and will cover topics such as evaluating, graphing, combining and solving functions, specifically polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.

 

SOCI-7004-01 – Introduction to Sociology 2 | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course introduces the student to the sociological study of society. Sociological concepts, theories, and methods will be discussed within the following areas: culture, socialization, social institutions, social stratification, deviance, race, gender, and social change. The course is designed to objectively analyze and criticize society from a sociological point of view.

Only students who have completed SOCI-7003 are eligible to take SOCI-7004.

 

SPAN-3003-01 – Discovering Spanish | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is designed for students who have little or no background in Spanish. It will concentrate primarily on developing the students' oral skills, but will also deal with some of the fundamentals of grammar and writing. It will also aid students in acquiring sufficient vocabulary to be able to communicate with some ease in a variety of everyday contexts. Students, through the study of the language, will also get an overview of the cultures and customs of various Spanish-speaking countries.

 

WRIT-1030-03 – Reason & Writing 1 | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course will introduce students to essential principles of reading, writing, and reasoning at the post-secondary level. Students will identify, summarize, analyze, and evaluate multiple short readings and write persuasive response essays to develop their vocabulary, comprehension, grammar, and critical thinking.

 

WRIT-1034-01 – Reason & Writing 1 (EAP) | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 4.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course will introduce students whose first language is not English to essential principles of reading, writing, and reasoning at the post-secondary level. Students will identify, summarize, analyze, and evaluate multiple short readings and write persuasive response essays to develop their vocabulary, comprehension, grammar, and critical thinking. Special attention will also be paid to developing academic vocabulary, correcting common ESL errors, enhancing academic listening and note-taking skills, and improving oral fluency and confidence.

BIOL-3013-01 – College Qualifying Biology | Start: Jan. End: Apr.

Anti-requisite: BIOL-1012 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course provides students with an understanding of anatomical and physiological features in animals, and plant functions and development. It also provides the credit needed for programs where Grade 12 College Biology is required for entrance to the program.

 

CHEM-3015-01 – College Qualifying Chemistry | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: CHEM-3001 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course covers modern atomic theory and the periodic table; chemical bonding, gases, and gas laws, liquids and solids; solutions and concentrations; acids, bases and salts; oxidation-reduction reactions; nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. It also provides the credit needed for programs where Grade 12 College Chemistry is required for entrance to the program.

 

FILM-3006-01 – Film 2: Film Criticism and Theory | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: FILM-5001 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

How can film theories of the 19th and 20th centuries impact our ability to understand the underlying meaning of film? Students learn how to evaluate films based on popular theories - including auteur theory, mass culture theory, genre criticism, and psychoanalysis. Special attention will be paid to how early theories based around technique influenced contemporary filmmakers. Students will be required to watch one film per week outside of class time.

 

HIST-7005-01 – History of Western Art 2 | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is intended as an introduction to key works in the history of western art and architecture through an examination of their intellectual and social contexts. This course is a university transfer course, and is the equivalent of VAH040 (History of Western Art) at the University of Western Ontario. The overall goal of this course is to provide a working knowledge of the history of western art and architecture as well as a foundation for critical thinking about art's history.
Only students who have completed HIST 7004 are eligible to take HIST 7005.

 

INDG-3001-01 – Indigenous Resistance | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: ABST-3008 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

Students gain exposure to Indigenous resistance movements across the globe. Within this framework, students learn about the current efforts of Indigenous artists, authors, athletes, photographers, musicians, filmmakers, educators, and language revitalizers who collectively are changing stereotypes about Indigenous populations. Students learn first-hand from guest speakers about ways they can co-facilitate this movement and acquire a deeper knowledge of Indigenous people and their vibrant history, which is reshaping conceptions of the future.

 

MKTG-3036-01 – Marketing: Industry Insight | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: MKTG 1032 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

Marketing influences where we spend our money: the stores, restaurants, services and businesses that are part of our daily lives. Marketing: Industry Insight is a survey course that introduces students to basic concepts of marketing and develops their understanding of why marketers are passionate about attracting the consumer's attention. Topics include identifying market segments, targeting consumer groups, and pricing strategies.

 

PSYC-3016-01 – Psychology | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: INDS-5004 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

Welcome to Introductory Psychology! Psychology is the scientific study of how our thoughts, emotions, and behaviours influence who we are and why we do what we do. This introductory course will offer you opportunities to explore the various perspectives of psychology including learning and cognition; social, humanistic, and biological aspects of psychology are emphasized. For instance, general topics include: biology of the brain, perception, consciousness, memory, motivation, personality, psychological disorders, and social psychology. What we learn from the science of psychology is that our ability to describe, explain, and predict our thoughts, emotions, and behaviour is not as basic as common sense would have it.

BIOL-3013-60 – College Qualifying Biology | Start: Jan. End: Apr.

Anti-requisite: BIOL-1012 | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course provides students with an understanding of anatomical and physiological features in animals and plant functions and development. It also provides the credit needed for programs where Grade 12 College Biology is required for entrance to the program.

 

CHEM-3015-60 – College Qualifying Chemistry | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: CHEM-3001 | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course covers modern atomic theory and the periodic table; chemical bonding, gases, and gas laws, liquids and solids; solutions and concentrations; acids, bases and salts; oxidation-reduction reactions; nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. It also provides the credit needed for programs where Grade 12 College Chemistry is required for entrance to the program.

 

COMM-3073-60 – Communications | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course focuses on written and verbal communication skills. Students learn to prepare a variety of professional documents. In addition, students learn about research methods and documentation formats. The principles of effective writing – organization, grammar, style, clarity, and tone – are reinforced throughout the course. The goal of the course is to prepare students for the communication tasks and considerations they will encounter in the workplace and/or future education in order to meet the needs of employers and/or the communities they will serve.

 

MMED-3016-60 – Media Matters | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

How do we define media? More importantly, how do media define us? In this course, we will seek answers to significant questions about the power and influence that media have in our lives. By studying the media's revolutionary evolution through history, including the current digital revolution, students will develop the ability to respond critically to the media that surround us, and influence our culture.

 

PHIL-7003-60 – Introduction to Philosophy 2 | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

In a collegial manner, we shall explore the perennial puzzles of philosophy. What kinds of things exist and why? What am I, and why do I exist? How should I behave and why?
Only students who have completed PHIL-7002 are eligible to take PHIL-7003.

 

WRIT-1030-60 – Reason and Writing | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course introduces students to essential principles of reading, writing, and reasoning at the post-secondary level. Students will identify, summarize, analyze, and evaluate multiple short readings and write persuasive response essays to develop their vocabulary, comprehension, grammar, and critical thinking.

 

WRIT-3010-60 – Creative Writing | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This is a creative writing course that is workshop-centered. It introduces professional techniques for writing meaningful and entertaining short fiction and non-fiction for a diverse publishing market. Students engage in writing exercises, research, and the development of creative writing assignments. As well, students will learn to pitch their works and submit a package of original writings to agents and publishers.

ANAT-3011-61 - College Qualifying Anatomy | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: ANAT-3008 / ANAT-1022 | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course covers topics including the heart, blood vessels, circulation, nutrition, metabolism, development and inheritance. Students also study the lymphatic, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.

 

HIST-3020-61 - Modern History: 1945 - Present | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course surveys the significant political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic developments that define the modern period from 1945 to the present day. While maintaining a predominantly North American perspective, this course introduces students to the major world events that define the latter half of the twentieth century.

 

LIBS-3002-61 - Liberal Arts 1: Big Ideas | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: LIBS-3001 | Delivery: Blended| Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

What are the major ideas that have shaped our understanding of the world? Learn how ancient Greek philosophy influences contemporary media. Study the historical foundations of the political debates in our culture, and examine the continuing importance of classical rhetoric to communication today.

 

MATH-3068-61 - Mathematics: Theory to Practice | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: MATH-2004 | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is for students who need to refresh or upgrade their mathematical knowledge and skills in preparation for entry into the College Qualifying Mathematics course (MATH-3069). It will cover topics such as operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals and exponents, as well as applications of these operations including ratios, proportions, and percents. The course finishes with an introduction to basic algebra. Attention is paid to deconstructing mathematical theories and applications in a student-centered environment permitting students to comprehend mathematical theory as it applies to real-world scenarios. It is strongly recommended that students who need review or preparation in foundational mathematics take this course.

 

MATH-3069-61 - College Qualifying Mathematics | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: MATH-2009| Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is for students who need a qualifying credit in mathematics for entry into college programs. It is based on the Ontario standards for Grade 12 College Preparation Mathematics, and will cover topics such as algebra, graphing, conversions, geometry, trigonometry, statistics, and personal finance.

 

PHYS-3005-61 - College Qualifying Physics | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

Physics is the study of how and why things happen. This course introduces students to the basic concepts of physics, such as motion, force, and energy by studying a variety of everyday applications and technological developments. These include simple machines, electrical devices, fluid systems, and communication technologies.

 

POLI-3005-61 - Politics | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

The study of politics is the study of conflict. This course will explore the competing interests that struggle for dominance in political systems across the globe. Can politicians be trusted? Do government institutions foster corruption? Assignments and material will critically explore the ideas and ideals that underlie contemporary political issues.

 

SOSC-1012-61 - Discovering the Social Sciences | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course connects the exciting world of social science to our everyday experiences. By highlighting discipline-specific tools and concepts used by anthropologists, psychologists, and sociologists, students gain insight into how people function and how relationships develop between individuals, society, and the global world. Discussions focus on current and controversial topics that deal with individual, social, and global concerns, allowing us to understand the origins and consequences for some of life's most pressing issues. This interdisciplinary approach leads to a better understanding of social science and gives students the foundation for future learning in all areas of study.

MATH-3069-62 - College Qualifying Mathematics  | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: MATH-2009 | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is for students who need a qualifying credit in mathematics for entry into college programs. It is based on the Ontario standards for Grade 12 College Preparation Mathematics, and will cover topics such as algebra, graphing, conversions, geometry, trigonometry, statistics, and personal finance.

 

CHEM-3014-62 – Chemistry: Select Topics | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: CHEM-1002| Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course teaches terminology, classification of matter, nomenclature, chemical formulae, chemical equations, calculation of quantitative composition of compounds, the mole concept, stoichiometry and related problem solving.

 

FILM-3008-62 – Film Noir | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is designed to develop a critical approach to film noir before moving on to explore its legacy for a range of more contemporary films, often referred to as neo-noir; to examine individual creative expression in the films of important noir filmmakers, with emphasis on the history and theory of film noir; to develop the ability to identify technical and thematic aspects dominant in film noir; and to discern mediocre and excellent filmmaking technique in film noir.

 

INDS-3024-62 – Science of Music | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course explores some of the ways in which our understanding of music has been shaped through science, from research into how humans perceive musical sound to how our perception of music has changed alongside technological developments. Musical examples will be used to illustrate the connections between science and music. No prior background in music or ability to read music is required.

 

LIBS-3003-62 - Liberal Arts 2: Contemporary Issues | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

Off to university? Prepare yourself by examining today's great thinkers and gaining a foundation in critical analysis, debate, and research. Students read works from a variety of disciplines, including the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. This course offers a one-hour-a-week computer lab tutorial.

 

PSYC-3022-62 – Specific Forms of Addictions | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

Where does one draw the line between an addiction and a passionately enjoyed activity? To answer this question, students will examine such activities as: chemical dependence, compulsive gambling, sex addictions, eating disorders, workaholism, and compulsive buying. We will engage in a comprehensive exploration of addictions' contributing factors, including co-occurring mental health issues, family dysfunction, and cultural conditioning. Although forms of treatment and prevention will be covered, these will not be the main focus. Instead, we will use a multidisciplinary lens to identify and understand specific addictive behaviours and their accompanying problems.

 

SOCI-3016-62 – Our Changing World | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This introductory sociology class will give students the basics of the scientific study of society. How are people's choices and lives shaped by culture, socialization, and patterns of social behaviour? Why do some groups have more power, money, and voice in our society than others? How are institutions such as the family and education changing, and are they prepared to meet the challenges of the 21st century? These questions, and more, will be examined by exploring key topics of theory, social processes (culture, socialization, and deviance), inequality (of race, gender, and class), and institutions (education and family). Throughout the course, we will critically examine how society works and sometimes doesn't.

 

INDG-1007-01 – Community Relationships | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course will survey the foundational relationship with Canada's Aboriginal communities, and the issues, practices, and considerations critical to relationship development. Students will explore the complexities and power relationships within, and amongst Aboriginal communities, and reflect on how Aboriginal worldviews, philosophies, and experiences inform contemporary professional practices. In this context, students will explore self-awareness; local, provincial, and national community dynamics; intergovernmental relations; political, social, and economic development and management strategies; activism and art; and, legal and ethical considerations.

BIOL-3012-63 – Biology: Select Topics | Start: Jan. End: Apr.

Anti-requisite: BIOL-1005 |Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

In this course, emphasis is placed on metabolic process in biology at the cellular level. The topics discussed include cell structures and functions, DNA structure and protein synthesis, evolution, molecular genetics, and population dynamics.

 

COMM-3073-63 – Communications | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course focuses on written and verbal communication skills. Students learn to prepare a variety of professional documents. In addition, students learn about research methods and documentation formats. The principles of effective writing – organization, grammar, style, clarity, and tone – are reinforced throughout the course. The goal of the course is to prepare students for the communication tasks and considerations they will encounter in the workplace and/or future education in order to meet the needs of employers and/or the communities they will serve.

 

ENGL-3022-63 – Comics | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course explores the story of comics, and how comics tell stories. We will investigate the development of comics as a medium as we apply the techniques of literary analysis to the course texts. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills in literacy and artistic analysis through the careful reading of texts, and by writing about, and discussing, these texts.

 

HIST-3023-63 – History of Medicine | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course offers a survey of the social history of medicine from antiquity to the present day, and introduces students to the most significant characters and cases in medical history. Students will gain an understanding of the social, economic, and political impact of outbreaks such as the plague, small pox, and AIDS, as well as significant medical advancements in the conceptualization of disease, health, and medical care. Topics include: Greek, Roman, and Renaissance medicine, the development of anatomy and psychiatry, and modern epidemics.

 

PHIL-3011-63 – Philosophy of Love | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

In this course, the student will be introduced to the study of concepts and beliefs surrounding love and sex. The course provides conceptual analysis and normative claims about such issues as consent, contraception, celibacy, etc. as well as discussions concerning types of love, marriage, and the alleged needs for uniqueness, constancy, and reciprocity in loving relationships.

 

PSYC-3027-63 – Forensic Psychology | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This class introduces students to central issues in the area of forensic psychology. Topics include criminal profiling, eyewitness memory, deception detection, psychopathy, interrogations and confessions, and jury decision-making. This course comprehensively examines the role of the forensic psychologist in the criminal justice system in Canada, and it focuses on the interaction between psychology and law, with an emphasis on Canadian applications.

 

PSYC-7007-63 – Introduction to Psychology 2 | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Blended | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is a two-semester introduction to modern scientific psychology. Topics include: history and research methods, the brain and behaviour, genetic and evolutionary influences on behaviour, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning and motivation, memory, language and cognitive processes, intelligence, lifespan development, social psychology, personality, health psychology, psychological disorders and treatment.
Only students who have completed PSYC-7006 are eligible to take PSYC-7007.

INDG-3004-01 – Contemporary Knowledge | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: ABST-3003 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

By examining current realities that are defining the evolution of Indigenous knowledge, students will gain a foundational capacity for participating in the future growth of this knowledge. Beginning with some of the original agreements that local Indigenous groups made with Europeans, to present day decisions affecting urban and rural Indigenous populations, students will gain the ability to navigate current power structures. Major themes include: identity development within the constructs of European legislation, efforts for language revitalization, responsibility for environmental protection, local band council operations, and the ethics of preserving Indigenous knowledge. Students will engage directly with local Indigenous decision-makers, elders, and knowledgeable guest speakers, and be encouraged to determine ways for appropriately managing resolutions.

Tuesdays 5 to 8 p.m.

 

WRIT-1091-01 – Reason & Writing: Indigenous | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course introduces students to essential principles of reading, writing, and reasoning at the post-secondary level. Students will identify, summarize, analyze, and evaluate multiple short readings, and write persuasive response essays to develop their vocabulary, comprehension, grammar, and critical thinking. Course content will emphasize contemporary Indigenous themes and issues.

Thursdays 4 to 7 p.m.

 

INDG-7002-01 – Indigenous Studies 2 | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: ABST-7002 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This is a survey of Canadian First Nations issues from academic and community perspectives, including Indigenous knowledge, cultural traditions, historical background, oral history, socio-political context, arts, language, and culture.
Only students who have completed INDG-7001 are eligible to take INDG-7002.

Thursdays 12 to 3 p.m.

 

FILM-3004-01 – Filmmaking 2 | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is designed as an introduction to the filmmaking process. The basic operations of camera, lighting, non-linear editing, and audio equipment will be taught through a series of demonstrations and hands-on exercises and projects. The students will complete basic production tasks such as scripting, directing, and producing. Media and file management will also be covered.

Wednesdays 5 to 8 p.m.

BIOL-3012-80 - Biology: Select Topics | Start: Jan. End: Feb.

Anti-requisite: BIOL-1005 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 6.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

In this course, emphasis is placed on metabolic process in biology at the cellular level. The topics discussed include cell structures and functions, DNA structure and protein synthesis, evolution, molecular genetics, and population dynamics. 

Mondays and Wednesdays 6 to 9 p.m.

 

BIOL-3013-90 – College Qualifying Biology | Start: Mar. End: Apr.

Anti-requisite: BIOL-1012 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 6.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course provides students with an understanding of anatomical and physiological features in animals and plant functions and development. It also provides the credit needed for programs where Grade 12 College Biology is required for entrance to the program.

Mondays and Wednesdays 6 to 9 p.m.

 

CHEM-3014-80 – Chemistry: Select Topics | Start: Jan. End: Feb.

Anti-requisite: CHEM-1002 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 6.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course teaches terminology, classification of matter, nomenclature, chemical formulae, chemical equations, calculation of quantitative composition of compounds, the mole concept, stoichiometry and related problem solving.

Tuesdays and Thursdays 6 to 9 p.m.

 

CHEM-3015-90 – College Qualifying Chemistry | Start: Mar. End: Apr.

Anti-requisite: CHEM-3001 | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 6.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course covers modern atomic theory and the periodic table; chemical bonding, gases, and gas laws, liquids and solids; solutions and concentrations; acids, bases and salts; oxidation-reduction reactions; nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. It also provides the credit needed for programs where Grade 12 College Chemistry is required for entrance to the program.

Tuesdays and Thursdays 6 to 9 p.m.

ANAT-3010-40 – Anatomy: Select Topics | Start: Jan. End: Apr.

Anti-requisite: ANAT-3008 / ANAT-1021 |Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This introductory course provides students with the fundamental knowledge of human anatomy and physiology. The material includes basic anatomical terminology, fundamental physiological principles, and an introduction to histology. The focus will be on the relationship between the structure and function of the major body systems including the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. The content of this course leads into ANAT-3011 (College Qualifying Anatomy).

 

ANAT-3011-40 – College Qualifying Anatomy | Start: Jan. End: Apr.

Anti-requisite: ANAT-3008 / ANAT-1022 |Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

The content of this course continues from ANAT-3010 (Anatomy: Select Topics), and provides students with the fundamental knowledge of human anatomy and physiology. The focus is on the relationship between the structure and function of the major body systems, including the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, and reproductive systems.

 

BIOL-3012-40 – Biology: Select Topics | Start: Jan. End: Apr.

Anti-requisite: BIOL-1005 | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

In this course, emphasis is placed on metabolic process in biology at the cellular level. The topics discussed include cell structures and functions, DNA structure and protein synthesis, evolution, molecular genetics, and population dynamics.

 

BIOL-3013-40 - College Qualifying Biology | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: BIOL-1012 | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course provides students with an understanding of anatomical and physiological features in animals and plant functions and development. It also provides the credit needed for programs where Grade 12 College Biology is required for entrance to the program.

 

CHEM-3014-40 – Chemistry: Select Topics | Start: Jan.End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: CHEM-1002 | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course teaches terminology, classification of matter, nomenclature, chemical formulae, chemical equations, calculation of quantitative composition of compounds, the mole concept, stoichiometry and related problem solving.

 

CHEM-3015-40 – College Qualifying Chemistry | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: CHEM-3001 | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course covers modern atomic theory and the periodic table; chemical bonding, gases, and gas laws, liquids and solids; solutions and concentrations; acids bases and salts; oxidation-reduction reactions; nuclear chemistry and organic chemistry. It also provides the credit needed for programs where Grade 12 College Chemistry is required for entrance to the program.

 

COMM-3073-40 or 41 – Communications | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course focuses on written and verbal communication skills. Students learn to prepare a variety of professional documents. In addition, students learn about research methods and documentation formats. The principles of effective writing - organization, grammar, style, clarity, and tone - are reinforced throughout the course. The goal of the course is to prepare students for the communication tasks and considerations they will encounter in the workplace and/or future education in order to meet the needs of employers and/or the communities they will serve.

 

CRIM-3001-40 – Criminology | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course introduces students to the study of crime and delinquency within a Canadian context. Topics included for study are the making of laws, the elements of crime, crime statistics, correlates and theories of crime, specific forms of crime, and strategies for crime control.

 

ENGL-3027-40 – Crime Stories| Start: Jan. End: Apr.

Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

Stories of crime and detection have been among the most popular narratives produced from the 19th century to the present. While popular crime stories have often been derided as cheap escapism, the Crime Stories course investigates a variety of fictional criminals and crime fighters to show popular narratives holding up society's moral mirror to dark and horrible deeds, and raising questions about the social and individual complexities of guilt, innocence, crime, and the means of punishment. The Crime Stories course surveys early to contemporary crime stories written in English in the form of short stories, television shows, novels, including the Postman Always Rings Twice, and films, including Memento.

 

INDG-3003-40 or 50 – Exploring Indigenous Ways of Knowing | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: ABST-3002 | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

Students engage directly with the traditional Indigenous knowledge of Southwestern Ontario through the words of local Elders and community recognized knowledgeable community members. Through exposure to traditional knowledge through first-hand experience, which continues to guide Indigenous people both locally and globally, a sense of community and respect for culture and identity will be fostered. Originating through local community members' input, this course provides students with an introduction to customary Indigenous knowledge which is the foundation for First Nations studies.

 

MATH-3068-40 – Mathematics: Theory to Practice | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: MATH-2004 | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is for students who need to refresh or upgrade their mathematical knowledge and skills in preparation for entry into the College Qualifying Mathematics course (MATH-3069). It will cover topics such as operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals and exponents, as well as applications of these operations including ratios, proportions, and percents. The course finishes with an introduction to basic algebra. Attention is paid to deconstructing mathematical theories and applications in a student-centered environment permitting students to comprehend mathematical theory as it applies to real-world scenarios. It is strongly recommended that students who need review or preparation in foundational mathematics take this course.

 

MATH-3069-40 – College Qualifying Mathematics | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: MATH-2009 | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is for students who need a qualifying credit in mathematics for entry into college programs. It is based on the Ontario standards for Grade 12 College Preparation Mathematics, and will cover topics such as algebra, graphing, conversions, geometry, trigonometry, statistics, and personal finance.

 

MATH-3079-40 – Calculus & Vectors | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is a Grade 12 Vectors and Calculus equivalent and is divided into two modules. The calculus module is an introduction to derivatives, and will cover topics such as average rates of change, limits, rules of derivatives, and graphing functions, along with their derivatives. The vectors module will cover topics such as graphing vectors, representing vectors in their different forms, and performing operations with vectors. Both modules with have a strong focus on real-world application problems.

 

MATH-3080-40 – Advanced Functions | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is a preparatory course for MATH-3079, Calculus and Vectors. It is based on the Ontario Standards for Grade 12 Advanced Functions, and will cover topics such as evaluating, graphing, combining and solving functions, specifically polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions.

 

PHYS-3005-40 – College Qualifying Physics  | Start: Jan. End:  Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

Physics is the study of how and why things happen. This course introduces students to the basic concepts of physics, such as motion, force and energy, by studying a variety of everyday applications and technological developments. These include simple machines, electrical devices, fluid systems, and communication technologies.

 

PSYC-3021-40 – Psychology of Religion  | Start: Jan. End:  Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course explores the function and development of religious experience in the human personality from a social scientific perspective, and seeks to integrate such understanding with the student's personal experience. Psychology of Religion attempts to apply the tools of empirical psychology to the study of religion. Its goal is an objective and fair analysis of the role of religious experience in the human personality. Specific religious experiences (e.g. conversion, prayer, speaking in tongues, and miracles) are examined with a view to understanding their function in the normal individual.

 

WMST-7003-40– Introduction to Women's Studies 2   | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

An Introduction to Women's Studies uses an interdisciplinary approach to study gender construction and the status of women in historical and cross-cultural contexts. The course also explores feminist theories and methodologies, and offers feminist perspectives on Canadian society.
Only students who have completed WMST-7002 are eligible to take WMST-7003.

 

WRIT 1030-40 – Reason & Writing 1  | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: Online | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course will introduce students to essential principles of reading, writing, and reasoning at the post-secondary level. Students will identify, summarize, analyze, and evaluate multiple short readings and write persuasive response essays to develop their vocabulary, comprehension, grammar, and critical thinking.

Design

COMP-3103-02 – Computer Technology for Design   | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is an extension of Computer Basics for Design. In this course students learn how to apply design principles in a digital environment using design related graphics software as well as an introduction to 3D modeling software applications.

Fridays 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

 

ARTS-3045-02 – Analytical Drawing   | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course builds on the skills learned in Drawing Basics. Students learn the fundamentals of composition with emphasis on rendering forms and objects using shade and shadow, as well as one point and two point perspective. Both freehand and drafting techniques are used to further the students' drawing skills, and better allow them to express creative ideas. Students will develop skills applicable to various design disciplines.

Mondays 2 to 6 p.m.

 

HIST-1042-02 – History of Design Survey   | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

Students will examine twentieth century art and design from a variety of perspectives including anthropology, sociology, economics, politics, and changes in culture and technology to enhance their understanding of the factors that have shaped contemporary design. Methodologies will include student research presentations, design projects, discussions, and lectures.

Tuesdays 4 to 7 p.m.

Fine Art

ARTS-1071-02 – Methods & Media in Drawing   | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

In this introductory course, students will investigate methods and materials in two dimensional artworks such as: watercolour, pencil, crayon, ink, pastel, relief printing, and collage. Emphasis will be placed on constructing composition, design principles, and implementing basic colour theory in drawing. Subject matter and visual resources may consist of studies from the object, figure, the constructed/natural landscape and pattern. Student will work in a variety of scales and use a variety of paper supports. Students will select from a list provided (see course plan), and explore a single theme throughout the term applied within the use of multiple drawing media. Compositions must be created from a variety of sources. For example, found and personal photographs, still life, direct observation, dioramas, imagination, etc.

Thursdays 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

 

ARTS-1007-03 – 2D & 3D Design   | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

In this course, formal, communicative and conceptual aspects of basic design are covered through projects, in-class assignments, lectures, and discussions. Students are presented with introductory visual problems and are challenged to devise their own solutions in both 2 and 3 dimensions, in a variety of media including computer graphics. Problem-solving skills, willingness to research, craftsmanship, and professionalism are all important to success in this course.

Mondays 8 to 10 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m. and independent hours, Mondays 10 to 11 a.m. and 3 to 4 p.m.

Pre Media

MMED-1036-02 – Performance for Contemporary Media   | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course will introduce students to the core concepts of “performing” for various types of media. Topics will include: announcing, acting, reporting, performing, pitching, interviewing, and presenting skills and techniques.

Tuesdays 2 to 5 p.m.

 

MMED-3031-02 – Interactive Media & Design 2   | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is designed to introduce students to the broad field of game design. Students will learn not only what defines a game, but also why people enjoy game play. This will include an introduction to concepts such as meaningful choice, intrinsic and extrinsic motivations, and the differences between games and play. A hands on, analytical, and experimental interaction with games will provide the foundation for game design.

Fridays 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

 

DEVL-3003-02 – Careers in Contemporary Media 2   | Start: Jan. End: Apr.
Anti-requisite: None | Delivery: In-class | Hours/Week: 3.0 | Credit Units: 3.0

This course is a continuation of Careers in Contemporary Media 1. Key concepts will include: presenting to groups, media ethics, copyright law, basic entrepreneurship/case studies, resume development, and professional development.

Fridays 3 to 6 p.m.