Winter 2024 course options

Courses are first come, first served—there are no waiting lists for courses that are full! We strongly advise you to register in your General Education course as soon as possible. This list of courses does not update when courses are full. When completing your registration you may need to try several courses before you find one that still has room for you to register.

How to Register

The following courses are: 

Online / Virtual 
Unscheduled / No Scheduled Hours / Asynchronous 
3hrs per week (3hr online) | 3 credits each  

Please note: Course options are subject to change without notice due to changes in planning. Please double-check course lists prior to completing your registration to ensure specific courses are still offered.

 

ANTH-1005-40  The Story of Us 

Where did humans come from? What is our relationship with the rest of the animal world? How did we become a species that walks upright, and has an unusually large brain? Why are we so diverse today? These are the sorts of questions asked by physical anthropologists, as they seek to understand 'what it means to be human'. This course will introduce this discipline, and assist students in gaining an understanding of: human inheritance; an appreciation of human diversity; primatology; the origins of humanity; and the development of early human culture.

CRIM-3001-40 Criminology 

This course introduces students to the study of crime and delinquency within a Canadian context. Topics included for study are: the making of laws, the elements of crime, crime statistics, correlates and theories of crime, specific forms of crime and strategies for crime control. 

ENGL-1030-40 Mystery & Suspense  

This course surveys the development of the mystery and suspense genre through a variety of short stories, television episodes, and films. We focus on historical context, characteristics and dominant themes of popular mystery and suspense genres from the late 19th century to modern day in exploring the enduring appeal of this genre. In addition to completing quizzes, students will also engage in creative assignments and write analytically about some of the texts in this course. 

ENGL-1047-40 Children’s Literature  

This course offers an introduction to literature for children from toddlers to young adults, including traditional classics and modern favourites. Required readings will include picture books, nursery rhymes, fairy tales, and excerpts from longer works. The focus will be on the critical appreciation of the meaning, theme, style, and appeal of each selection. The course will end in a culminating final project; please note there is no final exam.

ENGL-1062-40 Beyond Superheroes 

This course explores the story of comics and how comics tell stories: we will investigate the development of comics as a medium as we apply the techniques of literary analysis to the course texts. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills in literary and artistic analysis through the careful reading of texts, and by writing about and discussing these texts. 

ENGL-1063-40 Science Fiction & Fantasy  

This course introduces students to the tropes and conventions of science fiction and fantasy, exploring such themes as "progress," Otherness, the ethics of bioengineering, the conflict between good and evil, fate and free will, and the quest. Students will explore the history of the two genres, including various subgenres such as first contact stories, cyberpunk, dystopian literature, portal fantasy, high and low fantasy, and urban fantasy. 

ENGL-1067-40  Murder & Mayhem  

From Shakespeare's Macbeth and Poe's Tell-Tale Heart to Natural Born Killers, American Psycho, and The Dark Knight, literature and film have frequently explored the notion of the dark side or primitive instincts within us all. Often satirical, occasionally literal, such artistic expressions of our baser natures seem to hold universal appeal. The works studied in this course feature either a crazed killer or an innocent person drawn into a world of mayhem by the madness of society. We will discuss questions like, what circumstances or events lead human beings to abandon the conventional rules of civilization and to follow a more twisted path and how is art particularly well suited to reveal the psychology of misbehaviour? 

ENVR-1038-40 Climate Change, Adaptation & Innovation  

To mitigate the impacts of the climate crisis, we must minimize the human activities driving climate change and reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. Communities must also implement resilient strategies to adapt to the changing climate and impacts already being felt around the world. Covering emerging, innovative solutions in energy, food, agriculture, land use, industry, transportation, buildings, carbon sinks, health, and education, this course invites students to explore creative responses to address climate change and its impacts locally and beyond. All of humanity is predicted to be impacted by climate change, albeit not equally. In this course, students will be encouraged to explore why climate change disproportionally impacts vulnerable communities and how multiple intersecting identity factors influence how individuals are affected by the changing climate. While we have faced, and will continue to face, many challenges to mitigate and adapt to the changing climate, our successes will not only benefit the planet, but our society and economy as well.

ENVR-1038-41 Climate Change, Adaptation & Innovation  

To mitigate the impacts of the climate crisis, we must minimize the human activities driving climate change and reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. Communities must also implement resilient strategies to adapt to the changing climate and impacts already being felt around the world. Covering emerging, innovative solutions in energy, food, agriculture, land use, industry, transportation, buildings, carbon sinks, health, and education, this course invites students to explore creative responses to address climate change and its impacts locally and beyond. All of humanity is predicted to be impacted by climate change, albeit not equally. In this course, students will be encouraged to explore why climate change disproportionally impacts vulnerable communities and how multiple intersecting identity factors influence how individuals are affected by the changing climate. While we have faced, and will continue to face, many challenges to mitigate and adapt to the changing climate, our successes will not only benefit the planet, but our society and economy as well.

 

ENVR-1054-40  Around the World in 61 Days  

From Into the Wild and Being Canadian, to The Sex Lives of Cannibals and making Tracks, people have been both entertained and horrified by books and films that delve into why and where people travel and what they find when they get there. Travel literature and film emerges as a prominent genre in virtually all times and cultures. They raise issues concerning power and self-perception, cultural representation as well as imagination and pleasure. This course examines the places of travel, as well as the people who travel as they move through their own moral and spiritual quests.

FILM-1004-40 Film Genres – Epic  

This course is designed to develop a critical approach to the medium of film and epic films, to examine individual creative expression in the films of important directors within the genre, to develop the ability to identify technical aspects of film, and to discern mediocre and excellent use of filmmaking technique. Students will be required to watch one weekly film outside of class hours. Evaluation will be based on in-class quizzes as well as two essays and a final test. Some of the films which we will study include Collateral, Gladiator, Dances with Wolves, and Marvel's The Avengers. 

FILM-1007-40 Hollywood: The Viewers Perspective  

This course explores film from an audience perspective by analyzing both how and why our culture watches movies. The course examines the Hollywood formula and its appealing offer of comfort, closure, and familiarity to viewers. In addition, the degree to which cinematic rules can be bent and/or broken before an audience loses interest is a primary focus of the course. Focusing on four categories of film theory - Character Identification, the Male Gaze, Narrative, and Historical Context- this course examines the way mainstream film has influenced patterns of spectatorship, and promotes critical analysis of contemporary media. 

FILM-1009-40 Film Generes: Comedy  

This course is for movie lovers who want to study the presentation of comedy on the silver screen. An analysis of different approaches to humour will show how audience interpretation is shaped by various directors. We will also study the ways in which comedy reflects the social tastes and anxieties of our times. Students will be required to watch one weekly film outside of class hours. Some of the films which we will study are Horrible Bosses, 21 Jump Street, Bridesmaids, and Groundhog Day. 

GEOG-1007-40 Environmental Geography-Intro  

This geography and sustainability course is designed to offer students an introduction to issues of environmental science and human activities that affect the wellbeing of the planet. Current and problematic issues will be explored through time and across space using case studies from both Canadian and global locations. The course will examine these issues from environmental, economic, and social perspectives to better understand them and to recommend individual lifestyle choices to encourage positive change. Specific subjects to be investigated will include ecosystems and biodiversity, climate change, renewable energy resources, air and water pollution, food production, globalization, recycling and waste, and sustainable cities.

GEOG-1007-41 Environmental Geography-Intro  

This geography and sustainability course is designed to offer students an introduction to issues of environmental science and human activities that affect the wellbeing of the planet. Current and problematic issues will be explored through time and across space using case studies from both Canadian and global locations. The course will examine these issues from environmental, economic, and social perspectives to better understand them and to recommend individual lifestyle choices to encourage positive change. Specific subjects to be investigated will include ecosystems and biodiversity, climate change, renewable energy resources, air and water pollution, food production, globalization, recycling and waste, and sustainable cities.

HIST-1009-40  Contemporary History  

Only by knowing where we came from can we begin to know where we are going. This course explores the important events of the 20th century or what has been referred to as the 'revolutionary century'. Through a global perspective, we will examine such monumental events as the First and Second World Wars, the Russian Revolution, the rise of Fascism, the Cold War and how they shaped the world today. The course will also focus on the economic, political and cultural significance of these events globally, focusing on a number of different countries.

HIST-1031-40  The Century of Genocide  

Genocide -- the targeting of a group for destruction -- was so prevalent during the 20th Century that the period has been dubbed 'The Century of Genocide'. This course will examine genocide during the 20th Century with the purpose of helping students better understand what genocide is and the magnitude of genocide, what causes genocide, and how, if at all, genocide can be prevented or at least stopped. This course will examine what are considered to be the three seminal cases of genocide during the 20th Century: the Armenian Genocide (1915), the Holocaust (1933-1945), and the Rwandan Genocide (1994). This course will begin with an examination of what has unfolded in Darfur since 2003. Is Darfur the first genocide of the 21st Century? 

HIST-1052-40  The Ancient World 

This course focuses on the history of ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Near East, Greece and Rome. Emphasis is placed on the growth and decline of ancient societies, as well as on their contributions to the development of social and cultural traditions, many of which have survived into the modern world.

HIST-3026-40 Twenty Drugs that Changed the World

This online history course traces the discovery of some of the most important drugs that have impacted our world. It also examines the role of serendipitous discovery, self-experimentation, folk medicine, global coordination, and hard work in the development of drugs that provide merciful relief from pain, protect us from infectious microorganisms, and treat debilitating medical conditions. The course surveys twenty drugs that changed the world and explores the medical thinking that led to their discovery. Through asynchronous threaded conversations, core text and online readings, interactive exercises, and extensive video links, learners will discuss critical thinking questions that are posed in the online course modules.

HUMA-1024-40 Scenes from the Apocalypse

From fringe cults to Hollywood blockbusters, divine judgement to human-caused catastrophe, apocalypticism has been a preoccupation of Western culture since a figure known only as John penned the Book of Revelation nearly two thousand years ago. This course will explore various representations of the end of the world throughout history.  Though literally a revelation, apocalypse is often used to describe any narrative depicting a cataclysmic event, and both senses of the term will be examined.  We will also investigate what this compulsion to re-destroy the world says about our anxieties concerning the emergence of new sciences and technologies.

INDG-1022-40 Indigenous Women  

This course will examine the role of Indigenous women in customary Indigenous society and trace how the perspective of Indigenous woman has been drastically changed with contact with European people, through attempts at colonization, and objectifying and disrespecting the sacred role of Indigenous women in media. This course also responds to the request of the local Indigenous community to offer more courses with Indigenous content. 

INDS-1033-40 Video Game Theory  

This course will analyze the cultural and artistic significance of video games, and also the ways gaming reflects our larger relationships with technology. This course aims to discuss the relationship between video games and other media; gamers and the gaming community; and the important sociological, cultural, industrial, and economic issues that surround gaming. 

 

Note: Students in the Video Game Design and Development program (VGD) or Animation (ANI) cannot take this course as their General Education elective. 

INDS-1040-40 Conspiracy Theories  

This course explores the psychological and historical circumstances that have helped popularize conspiracy theories. Through an analysis of issues like the "fake" moon landing, "flat earth," 9/11 Truth, as well as various other conspiracies (some not-so-crazy, some very outlandish!), our course develops a philosophy of clear, rational thinking and then applies it to our contemporary world, asking difficult questions about how to explain, justify, and rationalize the stories we believe. Above all else, this course is about engaging intelligently, logically, and skeptically with stories presented to us, and it does so by teaching strategies for living skeptically with both the world and, more importantly, with ourselves. 

INDS-1050-40  Roots of Terrorism  

This online course will introduce students to issues related to modern terrorism, and it will explore the use of terrorism as an agent of political change through the 20th century, including a detailed examination of the definition of terrorism. Topics to be considered will include the ongoing struggles in the Middle East and ramifications of these struggles in the West. The use of terrorism in South America, the United States and Canada will be examined, as well as the relationship between religion and terrorism.  

INDS-1053-40  Disease in Culture   

From the black plague to the apocalyptic zombie invasion to the SARS and H1N1 epidemics, we have used disease to understand our relationships to society and to others. This course investigates the cultural paranoia of infection in visual and media culture. We study novels and films such as Blindness, Dawn of the Dead, and 28 Days Later, as well as recent media responses to the World Health Organization and the borders of disease. We confront questions such as: How do the ethics of quarantine translate into racial intolerance? Is the fear of contagion related to possession? Are we judged by the diseases we contract, or by how we handle ourselves in times of widespread infection and crisis?

INDS-1058-40  Foodonomics: Starving for the Truth    

How can we have an epidemic of obesity when most of the world is starving? How can the very thing that's supposed to bring us strength and longevity make us ill? The answer is simple: Food is big business. In this course we discuss foodonomics or the business of food. We examine what we really know about the food we eat, the way food defines cultures and traditions, the plight of the local farmer, and controversies such as bioengineered and drug crops. We also discuss the validity of the organic and buy local movements, the positive and negative effects of globalization, and how and why our food is making us sick. Finally, we examine the true power of agriculture and why some are starved while others are stuffed.

INDS-1060-40  Robots, Cyborgs & Androids in Fiction  

From early notions of clockwork humans to contemporary concerns about the possibilities of cloning and artificial intelligence, the idea of mechanically enhanced or replicated human beings has continually challenged the ways we think about what it means to be human. This course looks at how our hopes and fears of technologically reproducing and enhancing humans have been explored in fiction-short stories, films, and a play-from the 19th century to the present. 

INDS-1061-40  Technology & Culture      

Does technology make our lives easier? When we gain benefits from new innovations, is there always something lost? Should we draw a line on how far we want technology to go? This course will help answer these questions through an exploration of technological innovations that change the way we live both at home and at work.

INDS-1066-40  Technologies of Torture

The brazen bull, the rack, tongue clips, electro-shock weapons: all technologies of torture, ancient or modern, deadly or not, attest to the dark side of human creativity. Since recorded history, those in power have examined the human body and mind in order to discover the most effective methods of violating both. In this course, we will compare past technologies of torture to present ones in an attempt to shed light on crucial transformations in the manipulation of power. We will also be exploring representations of torture in diverse cultural productions (literature, film, television, and other contemporary media) in order to open up a critical debate over the interplay between technology, torture, and power.   

INDS-1075-40  Digital Identity        

What is the cultural impact of social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter? How important is having an online identity? In this course, students will engage with issues of new media integration and take up questions of online identity. While the digital realm is often complicated and chaotic, this course explores the space(s) that subjectivity takes up and in turn reflects onto broader issues of identity. Beginning with theories originating in the late 19th century, students will consider the online world in and outside of the classroom both on a personal and on a social level. This course aims to help students critically reflect on the ever shrinking line between online and offline identity and its impact on culture at large.

INDS-1081-40 Personal Wellness         

This course introduces students to the concept of wellness. Students develop strategies for a healthy lifestyle in all aspect of their lives. Through traditional lectures and learning activities, they learn through both individual and group processes. They investigate wellness as it applies to mindfulness, self-responsibility, social/emotional development, stress-management, physical activity, spirituality, substance abuse, nutrition, and complementary health. This course provides the opportunity for students to evaluate their present lifestyle, identify successes, and develop areas requiring personal growth.

INDS-1081-41 Personal Wellness         

This course introduces students to the concept of wellness. Students develop strategies for a healthy lifestyle in all aspect of their lives. Through traditional lectures and learning activities, they learn through both individual and group processes. They investigate wellness as it applies to mindfulness, self-responsibility, social/emotional development, stress-management, physical activity, spirituality, substance abuse, nutrition, and complementary health. This course provides the opportunity for students to evaluate their present lifestyle, identify successes, and develop areas requiring personal growth.

INDS-1081-42 Personal Wellness         

This course introduces students to the concept of wellness. Students develop strategies for a healthy lifestyle in all aspect of their lives. Through traditional lectures and learning activities, they learn through both individual and group processes. They investigate wellness as it applies to mindfulness, self-responsibility, social/emotional development, stress-management, physical activity, spirituality, substance abuse, nutrition, and complementary health. This course provides the opportunity for students to evaluate their present lifestyle, identify successes, and develop areas requiring personal growth.

INDS-1088-40 The Ever-Changing Workplace 

It sometimes seems like the terms "job" and "career" mean the same thing. In fact, they have very different meanings. In this course students will learn the difference between both, culminating in a journey that lasts a lifetime! Students will participate in self-reflection and careers and skills exploration. Furthermore, students will gain an understanding regarding key issues around the new world of work, diversity, communication and workplace expectations and etiquette. This course will give students the opportunity to explore the sociological trends, as well as historical shifts, regarding employment standards and evolution of workplace communication. 

INDS-1092-40  It’s About Time 

Many people find themselves obsessed with something they can't actually explain - Time! There have been great movies and TV shows with time as a focus of the story - but where did the writers get their ideas? This course will help students develop an understanding of time by looking at some of those stories (anything from The Time Machine to the time loop-comedy Groundhog Day) while exploring the scientific (does time exist), philosophical (how time progresses) and psychological (objective vs. subjective experiences) theories of time shaping those stories. Students will also be introduced to various time management strategies in order to spend the time they have effectively.

INDS-1093-40 The Global Drug Trade  

This course examines addictive substances as a global commodity, tracing their impact on issues of race, empire, and inequality. Beginning with the opium wars of the nineteenth century and concluding with narco violence in present-day Mexico, students will gain an understanding of the various impacts of the drug trade on the modern world. Beyond simple issues of criminality and policing, transnational flows of licit and illicit drugs shape how societies interact with one another and reveal persistent power imbalances. During the course, students will be introduced to an extensive and surprising cast of characters - from imperial administrators to Colombian drug lords; CIA agents to Central American villagers; mafia dons to pharmaceutical sales reps. 

INDS-1093-41 The Global Drug Trade  

This course examines addictive substances as a global commodity, tracing their impact on issues of race, empire, and inequality. Beginning with the opium wars of the nineteenth century and concluding with narco violence in present-day Mexico, students will gain an understanding of the various impacts of the drug trade on the modern world. Beyond simple issues of criminality and policing, transnational flows of licit and illicit drugs shape how societies interact with one another and reveal persistent power imbalances. During the course, students will be introduced to an extensive and surprising cast of characters - from imperial administrators to Colombian drug lords; CIA agents to Central American villagers; mafia dons to pharmaceutical sales reps. 

INDS-1095-40  History of Rock & Roll: 70s/80s/90s

This course examines the social, cultural, and musical history of rock and roll in the 70's, 80's, and early 90's. It examines the fragmentation of rock and roll which took place in the 70's and 80's when rock no longer dominated the pop charts. It also examines in detail how punk affected the evolution of rock and roll. 

INDS-1103-40 King Arthur  

This course introduces students to the origins of King Arthur stories and to Arthurian symbols such as Excalibur, the Round Table, and the Holy Grail. We will read some traditional and contemporary stories about King Arthur; we will also view some contemporary films. As the course progresses, students will better understand the ongoing appeal of characters such as King Arthur, Guinevere, Morgan la Fay, Merlin, Lancelot, and the Lady of the Lake. 

INDS-1105-40  Technology & War  

From chariots thousands of years ago to drones today, humans have always used technology to gain an edge over their opponents in battle. This course will survey some of the major innovations and developments, such as the introduction of iron, the use of gunpowder, or the invention of the airplane, and examine how various peoples have employed military technology from Antiquity to the present. 

INDS-1107-40 Hip-Hop Music and Culture  

What began as a grassroots cultural movement at society's margins in the 1970's, quickly became a powerful force by the 80's and 90's. Hip-Hop refers to a variety of complex elements that inspire everything from music to dance, movies, fashion, advertising & sports. Influenced by jazz and blues, poetry, jailhouse toasts & West African beats, this course will explore Hip-Hop as an art form, a business, a myth, an attitude, and a moral force. 

INDS-1109-40 Fake News  

In this engaging and innovative course, students will learn to identify, track, and interpret the online phenomena of 'fake news.' These practical internet skills will help us answer the difficult questions raised by 'fake news.' Is there a difference between 'fake news' and propaganda? Is 'fake news' a new phenomenon, or simply an amplification of existing media trends? Have we entered what some people have called a 'post-truth' era? What critical thinking skills do we need to navigate this new media landscape? Students will be asked to research and reflect on these questions, provide examples, and produce their own online content. 

INDS-1110-40 Stranger Things  

What lies on the outer recesses of the scientifically known universe? Throughout human history, people have engaged in a wide array of strange and incredulous beliefs and practices. They have sought to find hidden realms, special powers, and concealed entities that evade our day-to-day perceptions and expectations. This course will examine the historical origins, practices, and beliefs of such strange things. Topics covered will include inter-dimensional beings and aliens, cryptozoology, monster hunting, the many expressions of extrasensory perception, psi powers, out of body experiences and dreams, divination practices such as tarot and astrology, ghost-hunting, séances, and many other occult magical beliefs and practices. 

INDS-1130-40 Disability Studies       

Have you ever noticed how many movie villains walk with a limp, have a scar across their face, or are part bionic? Have you ever wanted to know why they do. . . and why our heroes do not? This course explores cultural representations of disabilities. While uncovering a wide range of disabled representations on the page, the stage, and the screen, we will seek to understand the social stigmas surrounding disabled identities. We will also think about how disability as a marker of difference connects to other misunderstood or misrepresented identities by considering markers of race, class, religion, and gender.

PHIL-1009-40 Ethics & Society  

What is the right thing to do? Although this turns out to be a remarkably difficult question to answer, it is the central focus of this course, and we will try to come at it from two different directions. On the one hand, we will consider a number of ethical theories that attempt to give a general, theoretical underpinning for morality. On the other hand, we will approach the question of the right thing to do from the context of particular moral problems that confront modern society such as world poverty, euthanasia, and the freedom of speech. If you want to be better prepared to debate ethical topics by understanding the issues behind them, then this course is for you. 

PHIL 1013-40 Philosophy of Humour  

In this course, students will discover that there is no single or universal theory that can adequately explain the impact humour has on society, culture, or politics. Granted, there are many competing theories that examine the relationship between humour, satire, and laughter. Attempts to adequately understand each one are as old as philosophy itself. In fact, the absence of a single unifying theory underlines the attention that we should give to each of the various theories that view the importance of humour-as-criticism. Once we examine the role of humour as a critical response to social situations, students will be able to answer the quintessential postmodern question: Can we be both humorous and politically correct? 

POLI-1018-40 Pirates, Smuggling & Underground Economies  

Not just confined to legend and cinema, modern-day pirates pose increasing problems for world leaders. Human trafficking, information piracy, corporate fraud, and weapons smuggling drain precious resources from governments. As international law struggles to keep up, kleptocratic dictators and white collar criminals continue to amass illicit fortunes. This course looks at various types of piracy, its impact on government and individuals, and possible solutions to combat piracy at all levels. 

PSYC-1027-40 Human Relations  

To a very large degree, the satisfaction we experience in life is greatly influenced by the quality of our interpersonal relationships. There are numerous personal and social factors that play a role in shaping our thoughts, feelings and behaviour with others. As such, this course is designed to examine some of the fundamental variables underlying the dynamics of human relations. The particular topics of interest will include culture, socialization, personality, the self-concept, perception, emotions and communication factors. At the end of this course, the successful student will have learned the skills and knowledge essential for both personal and career development. 

PSYC-1047-40  Human Sexuality  

This course will introduce students to human sexuality with a focus on practical information for everyday living. The course will include a broad knowledge base about sexuality by exploring the biological, social, psychological, and historical aspects. The course will encourage an understanding of the various influences on the development of one’s sexual knowledge, attitudes, relationships, and behaviours. 

PSYC-1067-40  A Culture of Addictions  

As an introductory and interdisciplinary survey of the role of addiction in human cultures, this course is designed to expose students to how narcotic as well as non-narcotic-related addiction manifest themselves within various individual and institutional practices. In particular, students will explore the major biological, psychological and social/cultural theories applied to addiction. Focus is given to the nature of drug use, conceptions of 'the addict,' how drugs impact the brain, the impact on family, and consequences for changing social drug behaviors. This course also explores current theoretical and practical treatment approaches and education and prevention strategies. Emphasis will be given to special issues and hot topics in drug addiction, including youth, women, media portrayal of drug use and current debates on the war on drugs. Finally, understanding common perspectives on treatment and prevention strategies related to drug dependence and education will be studied. 

PSYC-1067-41  A Culture of Addictions  

As an introductory and interdisciplinary survey of the role of addiction in human cultures, this course is designed to expose students to how narcotic as well as non-narcotic-related addiction manifest themselves within various individual and institutional practices. In particular, students will explore the major biological, psychological and social/cultural theories applied to addiction. Focus is given to the nature of drug use, conceptions of 'the addict,' how drugs impact the brain, the impact on family, and consequences for changing social drug behaviors. This course also explores current theoretical and practical treatment approaches and education and prevention strategies. Emphasis will be given to special issues and hot topics in drug addiction, including youth, women, media portrayal of drug use and current debates on the war on drugs. Finally, understanding common perspectives on treatment and prevention strategies related to drug dependence and education will be studied. 

PSYC-1094-40 Bring Your “A” Game: Psychology of Sport 

Have you ever wondered why the USA Olympic hockey team was more upset when they received a silver medal than the team who won the bronze? How do athletes maximize performance potential and what are the unwritten rules of retaliation and fighting in sport? This course delves into the principles of psychology that drive emotion, motivation, expectation, self-worth, and relationships of athletes and explores the different aspects of Sport Psychology. 

PSYC-1095-40 The Psychology of Willpower 

January 1st is often the first day that many people fail at their well-intentioned New-Year's resolutions. Why is it so hard to change, whether it be diet, exercise, smoking or any other habit? This course is an examination of the elusive power that each one of us possess: Willpower. Psychological research and theory related to cognitive and social influences on intention, self-control, behaviour change, and willpower are the topics of interest for this course. Application of course material to real-life will take the form of students attempting to change a habit in their life and report on the success or failure of the attempted change relating it back to the theories learned in class. 

PSYC-1100-40 Altered States of Consciousness  

The average adult will spend about 600 hours each year dreaming and have more than 100,000 dreams over a typical lifetime. We will spend 25 years of our lives sleeping. Have you ever wondered how consciousness changes while we sleep and dream? Why do some people dream in colour while others dream in black and white? How do hypnosis and medication and drugs alter consciousness? This course will familiarize students with some of the main issues in consciousness. Topics covered will include daydreaming, sleep, dreams, psychedelics, hypnosis, trance and meditation, and death. This is a theory-and research-based course into the world of consciousness, including various theories such as clinical and cognition. 

PSYC-1119-40 Unravelling Youth  

In this course we unravel the mystery of youth. We focus on critical issues including the development of personality, sexuality, morality, and identity. From a psychology perspective, we discuss how cognitive, emotional, physical, and social changes affect youth both positively and negatively. We examine the factors that can lead to social and behavioral problems, such as aggression, eating disorders, addictions, anxiety, and depression. This course provides valuable information that is applicable to careers in developmental psychology, social work, and other human services dealing with youth. It also provides information for those interested in their own development or in the development of the youth in their lives. This course provides an excellent opportunity to gain insight and to reflect upon one’s own experiences as a youth in Canada. 

PSYC-1121-40 Psychology of Music  

A song plays on the radio. Do you turn up the volume or change the station? That depends on the effect that song has on you. Music can profoundly influence humans, animals, and even plants. In this course we examine the psychological effects of music. We discuss our interpretations of music and the role of music in emotions, learning, consciousness, therapy, and health. We debate the purpose of music, whether music makes us smarter, how music changes our behaviour, and the effects of violent and provocative musical expression. Finally, we examine why one person's music is another person's noise. 

PSYC-1123-40 Art of Intelligence 

This course introduces students to the various forms and theories of intelligence. Topics include creativity, emotional intelligence, non-verbal intelligence, social intelligence, mindfulness, learning disabilities and exceptionalities. This course comprehensively examines the role of intelligence for personal and professional success, as well as the application of both verbal and non-verbal forms. 

RELG-1003-40 World Religions-Intro  

This course seeks to explore some of the world's major religious traditions. We will look at the historical, social, and cultural legacies of these faith-based traditions with an eye toward understanding how religion has helped to define our world. This introductory course will address many world religions including but not limited to Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism. No religious affiliation is presumed. Moreover, the fundamental assumption for the course is that it is possible to learn about and from a variety of different religious traditions without seeking to make students adherents of a single religious tradition or adherents of the notion that all religious traditions are basically the same. 

SOCI-1048-40 The Meaning of Sex  

Although we often think of sex and sexuality as natural processes, social influences also affect sexual attitudes and behaviours. This course will examine sexuality from a sociological perspective, examining how interactions, culture, and institutions affect this important dimension of human life. Ranging in topics as diverse as sexualized media to prostitution, the course will examine the impact of sexual culture, norms, and institutions in the modern world. 

SOCI-1073-40 Building Sustainable Societies  

The world's population has recently surpassed seven billion, and communities worldwide are facing numerous social, environmental, and economic problems. While gloomy headlines dominate environmental news, there are solutions. Building sustainable societies looks at current problems like urban sprawl, pollution, climate change, and suggests ways to reverse unsustainable trends. From growing food and gardens to developing more efficient transportation, to reducing waste and developing green buildings, sustainable societies move beyond diagnosing the problems to finding solutions. A key part of the course is to give students the insight and confidence to encourage sustainability in their own lives and communities. 

SOCI-1083-40 Women & Violence  

Women and Violence will explore the understandings, forms, and impacts of violence against women in a Canadian context. This course will provide an overview of both the theory and practice of anti-violence work and the controversies and debates - among both scholars and practitioners - that continue to surround this issue. Some of the themes covered in this course include prevalence, forms, and understandings of violence against women; the intersectionality of gender, race, class, and sexuality; the role of media; masculinities and violence; and politico-legal and socio-cultural approaches to address violence against women. 

SOCI-1083-41 Women & Violence  

Women and Violence will explore the understandings, forms, and impacts of violence against women in a Canadian context. This course will provide an overview of both the theory and practice of anti-violence work and the controversies and debates - among both scholars and practitioners - that continue to surround this issue. Some of the themes covered in this course include prevalence, forms, and understandings of violence against women; the intersectionality of gender, race, class, and sexuality; the role of media; masculinities and violence; and politico-legal and socio-cultural approaches to address violence against women. 

SOCI-1093-40 Homicide  

This 'Homicide' course will provide students with definitions of homicide and theoretical explanations from both the sociological and criminological traditions. Homicide can be described as the killing of one person by another. Society generally describes this act as murder. Homicide rates in Canada are reasonably low; however, certain individuals and groups are disproportionately at risk for this violent event. Through a criminology lens, this course aims to understand the relationship between social factors and crime. It combines theoretical perspectives with case studies to uncover who is at risk of being a homicide victim and how their life chances are impacted by social structures and inequality. Throughout the course, we will critically examine concepts including stereotypes, discrimination, rehabilitation, restorative, and social justice. 

SOSC-1012-40 Discovering the Social Sciences  

This course connects the exciting world of social science to our everyday experiences. By highlighting discipline-specific tools and concepts used by anthropologists, psychologists, and sociologists, students gain insight into how people function and how relationships develop between individuals, society, and the global world. Discussions focus on current and controversial topics that deal with individual, social, and global concerns, allowing us to understand the origins and consequences for some of life's most pressing issues. This interdisciplinary approach leads to a better understanding of social science and gives students the foundation for future learning in all areas of study. 

SOSC-1012-41 Discovering the Social Sciences  

This course connects the exciting world of social science to our everyday experiences. By highlighting discipline-specific tools and concepts used by anthropologists, psychologists, and sociologists, students gain insight into how people function and how relationships develop between individuals, society, and the global world. Discussions focus on current and controversial topics that deal with individual, social, and global concerns, allowing us to understand the origins and consequences for some of life's most pressing issues. This interdisciplinary approach leads to a better understanding of social science and gives students the foundation for future learning in all areas of study. 

SOSC-1033-40 Mysteries of Sleep 

Have you ever wondered why we dream? Why do our eyes sometimes twitch during sleep? What are the consequences of sleep deprivation? Through a variety of learning activities, students will navigate this complex and fascinating topic to uncover some of the mysteries of sleep. Drawing on fields of inquiry including neuroscience, psychology, and sociology, we will investigate some key theories on sleep and dreams and cover topics such as the circadian rhythm, sleep disorders, and sleep across the lifespan. Through self-reflection, students will also examine their own thoughts and behaviours around sleep with the purpose of fostering improved sleep hygiene.  

Table