Fall 2024 Degree Courses

Full-time and part-time degree students who are scheduled to complete a General Education elective should select their academic program from the list below to see the courses available to them.
 

How to Register for an Elective

Graduate Requirements & Planning Resources

Every degree student at Fanshawe must complete General Education Electives as part of their program. Without completing these courses, a student cannot graduate. Each degree program has a unique set of elective requirements based on course subjects and their academic level. Student should identify what electives they need to graduate and plan their course selection carefully.
 

View Planning Resources

Part-Time, Overload & Out-of-Sequence students

Part-time, overload and fee-paying out of sequence students will require permission to register. Please email gened@fanshawec.ca with your student number and the details of the course(s) you would like to register for.

Available Courses

Part-Time Post-Secondary students — defined as those who applied for their program through OCAS — are able to register directly online through WebAdvisor for their General Education electives. Part-Time Post-Secondary students should follow these instructions to register for their elective. 

Please select a course from list below - be sure to check your requirements to ensure you are taking the correct level (Intro vs. Upper).
 

Degree-Blended Band 1

Courses are first come, first served—there are no waiting lists for courses that are full! We strongly advise you to register in your General Education course as soon as possible. This list of courses does not update when courses are full. When completing your registration you may need to try several courses before you find one that still has room for you to register. 

Please note: Course options are subject to change without notice due to changes in planning. Please double-check course lists prior to completing your registration to ensure specific courses are still offered. 

The following course is:

Blended / In-Person 
Scheduled / Have Scheduled Hours / Synchronous 
3 hrs per week (2 hrs in-person + 1 hr online) | 3 credits each 

Weekday Time: Monday 11:00AM-1:00PM

Location: 1001 Fanshawe College Blvd. London, Ontario 

HUMA-7029-60 Culture of Genius

Degree Level: Intro
This is a course on the persistent cult and culture of genius. We will examine questions surrounding the definition,
function, purpose and politics of genius through a variety of media. Students will gain an appreciation for how and
why the concept of the 'genius' is deployed, both in child and adult contexts. Materials on this course range from
documentary, films and children's books/toys to television, philosophy and psychology. 

HUMA-7030-60 Alienation & Society 

Degree Level: Upper
This course uses literature, film, and theory on topics such as war, race, gender, and class to examine the concept
of alienation and its consequences for both individuals and society. From World War One poetry to David Fincher's
Fight Club, the western world has long been fascinated with the experience of alienation and the lure of the
alienated character. How does a person come to feel so isolated from his or her society? What motivates outsider
figures to behave in the ways they do? Through studying diverse genres from different time periods, students will be
exposed to a variety of representations on the theme while developing and enhancing their skills in critical analysis,
essay writing, and digital presentation.

SOSC-7002-60 Perspectives on Sport 

Degree Level: Upper
In this course we will examine the vital place of sport in modern societies. We will explore sports in relation to other
social institutions such as the media, education, and government; we will examine sport in relation to aspects of
social difference and inequality such as gender, race, class, and age; and finally, we will study sport and social
processes such as socialization and deviance. We will also look at how sports help promote a particular system of
values, shape national identity, and contribute to economic development. This part of the course provides students
with an understanding of the relationship between sports, the economy, and the political system. Students explore
both government approaches to sports and political issues related to sports in society. 

SOSC-7040-60 Miskaowin Ethics

Degree Level: Intro
In this course we will examine the vital place of sport in modern societies. We will explore sports in relation to other
social institutions such as the media, education, and government; we will examine sport in relation to aspects of
social difference and inequality such as gender, race, class, and age; and finally, we will study sport and social
processes such as socialization and deviance. We will also look at how sports help promote a particular system of
values, shape national identity, and contribute to economic development. This part of the course provides students
with an understanding of the relationship between sports, the economy, and the political system. Students explore
both government approaches to sports and political issues related to sports in society. 

Degree-Blended Band 2

Courses are first come, first served—there are no waiting lists for courses that are full! We strongly advise you to register in your General Education course as soon as possible. This list of courses does not update when courses are full. When completing your registration you may need to try several courses before you find one that still has room for you to register. 

Please note: Course options are subject to change without notice due to changes in planning. Please double-check course lists prior to completing your registration to ensure specific courses are still offered. 

The following course is:

Blended / In-Person 
Scheduled / Have Scheduled Hours / Synchronous 
3 hrs per week (2 hrs in-person + 1 hr online) | 3 credits each 

Weekday Time: Friday 9:00AM-11:00AM

Location: 1001 Fanshawe College Blvd. London, Ontario 

PHYS-7007-60 Nanotechnology

Degree Level: Intro
Want to improve your golf game? Make your car drive faster and be more fuel efficient? Want the colour of your
clothes to be more vibrant? Due to the advancements in nanotechnology all of this can now be achieved.
Nanomaterials have unique chemical and physical properties that can be utilized to make things lighter, faster, and
more durable. This course will introduce different nanomaterials and discuss the difference between nanosize and
bulk objects. This course will also illustrate the advancements over the past few centuries in nanotechnology and
explore their current and potential applications.

PHYS-7011-60 Cosmic Extremes

Degree Level: Upper
This course will take you on a thrilling tour of the birth, evolution and death of stars, culminating in a space-time
bending encounter with the most monstrous of all universal phenomena - black holes. You will travel to the event
horizon of these cosmic oddities and bask in their Hawking radiation. You will explore the hearts of the most
massive galaxies where the hungriest of these cosmic leviathans lie and witness the violence wrought by their
insatiable gravitational appetite. Beware, this is a one-way trip; not even light can escape!

SOSC-7042-60 Mind & Behaviour

Degree Level: Intro
Have you ever wondered why you think the way you do? Why you behave the way you do? And why others are so
similar yet so different from you? In this introductory psychology course, we examine the biological, social, and
cognitive factors that make us who we are. We discuss our development,the power of our brain, how we learn and
remember, and how we interpret the world around us. We delve into our complex thought processes, the
motivations behind our behaviours, and the influence of social relationships, emotions, and stress on our health and
well-being. Finally, we examine the causes and treatments of psychological disorders, such as depression,
anxiety,schizophrenia, and antisocial personality disorder. Through this course, students will gain insight into the
factors that influence the way they think and behave.

SOSC-7043-60 The Big Lie

Degree Level: Upper
The North American disinformation ecosystem actively subverts the so-called four corners of deceit: government,
academia, science, and media. The goal of this course is to arm students with historical examples, along with a
toolkit of strategies taken from philosophy, as well as social and political thought, to help them examine and
understand the following topics: post-truth, cognitive dissonance; cognitive bias, misinformation and disinformation;
the history of conspiratorial thinking in popular culture; and the algorithmic ease with which social media
exacerbated the spread of disinformation

Online

All students can choose an online General Education elective course. International students should verify they have the appropriate number of in-person hours before registering for an online course. 

Courses are first come, first served—there are no waiting lists for courses that are full! We strongly advise you to register in your General Education course as soon as possible. This list of courses does not update when courses are full. When completing your registration you may need to try several courses before you find one that still has room for you to register. 

Please note: Course options are subject to change without notice due to changes in planning. Please double-check course lists prior to completing your registration to ensure specific courses are still offered. 

The following courses are:

Online / Virtual 
Unscheduled / No Scheduled Hours / Asynchronous 
3hrs per week (3hr online) | 3 credits each 

GBLC-7003-40 Sociology of World Religions

Degree Level: Upper
What is religion? Who is God? In this upper-level hybrid religious studies course, students will learn about our global
world religions. This course will allow students to study religions such as Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism,
Confucianism, Islam, Christianity and many more. Each student will learn about and present a religion through its
history, literature, traditions, customs and rituals. The goal of this course is to introduce the academic study of world
religions. Students will not engage in personal religious dialogue; instead they will study religion from a critical and
academic perspective. In this course we will engage the study of religion with the goal of being open-minded and
seeing the world from a more complex and humanitarian perspective. 

GBLC-7014-40 Technology of State Torture   

Degree Level: Upper
The brazen bull, the rack, tongue clips, electro-shock weapons: all technologies of torture, ancient or modern,
deadly or not, attest to the dark side of human creativity. Since recorded history, those in power have examined the
human body and mind in order to discover the most effective methods of violating both. In this course, we will
compare past technologies of torture to present ones in an attempt to shed light on crucial transformations in the
manipulation of power. We will also be exploring representations of torture in diverse cultural productions (literature,
film, television, and other contemporary media) in order to open up a critical debate over the interplay between
technology, torture, and power.

GBLC-7015-40 Environment & Culture   

Degree Level: Intro
The goal of this readings-based course is to provide students with a framework for understanding their local,
national, and global environments, and especially the environmental challenges we presently face as people living in
Canada and in the world at large. We will examine the interrelations of nature, technology, and culture by analysing
what it means to live at the tolerance margins of our uses of fossil fuels, water, modern food systems, and pollutants
such as plastic. We will also examine past environmental collapses and survivals to learn for the future and research
communities engaged in environmental activism today. 

HUMA-7026-40 Role of Garbage in Society  

Degree Level: Upper
Garbage is all around us. We create and dispose of it every day. Yet for the most part we do not pay much attention
to the material and symbolic role it plays in human society. This course begins with the following question: can
garbage tell us something about ourselves? Through academic essays, popular articles, documentaries, television
shows and commercials, artwork, literature, and Hollywood film, we will study trash from numerous perspectives to
account for its prominence in our daily lives and understand its relationship to our contemporary society. 

HUMA-7043-40 Narrative of Travel & Tourism  

Degree Level: Upper
This course is concerned with the way contemporary travel writing engages with and tries to reconcile socio-political
struggles, such as the protection of human rights, the promotion of democracy, the management of equality within
multiculturalism, and the reduction of inequality, that continue to persist despite the forces of globalization. In their
attempt to combat regimented and outmoded ideas of foreignness, travel writers continue with these struggles and
stereotypes that shape the experience of modern travel. Narratives of Tourism and Travel is a thoroughly
interdisciplinary course that draws from international relations, literary theory, political theory, geography,
anthropology, and history. 

SOSC-7011-40 Social Implications of Addiction  

Degree Level: Upper
As an introductory and interdisciplinary survey of the role of addiction in human cultures, this course is designed to
expose students to how narcotic as well as non-narcotic- related addictions manifest themselves within various
individual and institutional practices. In particular, students will explore the major biological, psychological and
social/cultural theories applied to addiction. Focus is given to the nature of drug use, conceptions of 'the addict,' how
drugs impact the brain, the impact on family, and consequences for changing social drug behaviors. This course
also explores current theoretical and practical treatment approaches and education and prevention strategies.
Emphasis will be given to special issues and hot topics in drug addiction, including youth, women, media portrayal of
drug use and current debates on the war on drugs. Finally, understanding common perspectives on treatment and
prevention strategies related to drug dependence and education will be studied.

SOSC-7012-40 America & the Bomb 

Degree Level: Intro
The nuclear bomb cast a long shadow over American culture throughout much of the twentieth century. In this
course, we will examine the historical aspects of this phenomenon and imaginative responses to it; these responses
include science fiction, film, poetry, short stories, and Dr. Seuss. The students in this course will gain an
appreciation for the degree of fear generated by the Cold War, and for how this fear shaped artists, including those
who were racially marginalized.

SOSC-7030-40 Anarchism

Degree Level: Intro
What is anarchism? Often misrepresented as being equated with chaos, vandalism and terror, anarchism instead is
a political philosophy with a particular view of human nature and particular visions around political, economic, and
social organization. It began in the 19th century in response to slavery, authoritarianism and capital exploitation, and
has over its history had supporters around the world. Direct expressions of anarchist ideas have re-emerged in
recent years, through the sharing economy, the Occupy movement, popular culture depictions (e.g. Mr. Robot, Rage
Against the Machine), and the development of cryptocurrencies. Today, anarchism is often focused on corporate
capitalism, environmental sustainability, indigenous rights, and sexual freedom. This course will explore the diversity
of anarchist ideas, anarchist critiques of political power and hierarchy, and review concrete examples of anarchism
in practice. 

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